Zero to 180 – Three Minute Magic

Discoveries of a Pop Music Archaeologist

Tag: Warner Bros. Records

60s/70s rock +/- pop
Zeroto180

Smokey And His Sister: Goodbye Cincinnati

The City of Cincinnati might want to consider a lawsuit – what is the statute of limitations on liner notes from an album released 54 years ago? I understand that Hal Halverstadt was merely playing up the difference between “small town” provincialism and “big city” sophistication for dramatic emphasis, but

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"Hidden Depth"
Zeroto180

Peter Green’s “Hidden Depth(s)”

Frankly, I’m surprised how little has been written about (original Fleetwood Mac guitarist) Peter Green‘s wondrous flight of fancy – “Hidden Depth” – a musical simulation of being strapped into a deep-sea submersible and dropped ever so slowly to the ocean’s bottom.  Marvel at the musical tranquility: “Hidden Depth” Peter

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"Come Softly to Me"
Zeroto180

“Come Softly to Me”: Cinematically Recast

Crossing Delancey – a surprisingly compelling “small film” about a pickle salesman in pursuit of love – features a soundtrack sprinkled with songs by The Roches, highlighted by their endearing cover of The Fleetwoods‘ #1 1959 hit, “Come Softly to Me,” the film score’s emotional centerpiece: Neither The Roches nor

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"Good Day Sunshine"
Zeroto180

“Good Day Sunshine”: Roy Redmond, Man of Mystery

It would appear that Roy Redmond recorded two 45s — both on Loma, a Warner Brothers subsidiary — and then, mysteriously, nothing more.  Redmond’s inspired and soulful take on “Good Day Sunshine” from The Beatles‘ startling and forward-thinking Revolver, named in 2010 as the best pop album of all time

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"Body Surfing With the Jet Set"
Zeroto180

“Body Surfing With the Jet Set”: Anyone for Beach Bums?

The words of Rod McKuen and music of Anita Kerr effortlessly intertwine on this breezy romp through the Pacific Coast of one’s mind: “Body Surfing With the Jet Set“ The San Sebastian Strings (1970) “Body Surfing With the Jet Set” serves, fittingly, as side one’s closing track of 1970 album,

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"Mandolina"
Zeroto180

“Mandolinia” vs. The Remarkable Riderless Runaway Tricycle

Media Alert! A battle has suddenly erupted between two formidable foes who share a common sound — the analog synthesizer.  Not just any analog synthesizer sound, mind you, but a deep burbling one:  pulsating and insistent. In this corner, wearing a strangely intricate electronic eyepiece, we have Ronnie Montrose with

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"Broccoli"
Zeroto180

“Broccoli”: Virtually Unknown in the US until the 1920s

1968 saw The Association release a strong album, Birthday, that included what may be “one of the greatest songs ever recorded,” to quote the person who posted this audio clip of “Everything That Touches You” (I can certainly understand the sentiment – have you heard the beautifully arpeggiated bass line

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"If You Never Say Goodbye"
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“If You Never Say Goodbye”: Warner Brothers Drops the Ball

Dionne Warwicke‘s first album for Warner Brothers in 1972, sadly, was her last with masterful songwriting duo, Burt Bacharach and Hal David, their partnership in the process of dissolution.  How perplexing that Warner Brothers would lure Dionne with a five-million dollar contract (big money in 1971) but then only release

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"Baroque-a-Nova"
Zeroto180

Mason Williams: Music + Comedy + Art

From David Bianculli‘s history of the Smothers Brothers’ groundbreaking television variety show, I discovered that Mason Williams was much more than the guy who wrote the million-selling instrumental, “Classical Gas.”   Williams not only recorded albums for Warner Brothers (and Mercury & Vee Jay) but also wrote incisive and edgy sketches for

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