Zero to 180 – Three Minute Magic

Discoveries of a Pop Music Archaeologist

Tag: Synthesizer

"Nashville Moog"
Zeroto180

“Nashville Moog”: Synth-a-billy

Tennessean synthesist, Gil Trythall, creates his own one-man electronic bluegrass band when he and his Moog synthesizer pay a visit to the Grand Ole Opry to shake up the Nashville musical establishment on “Nashville Moog” from 1973: “Nashville Moog” Gil Trythall (1973) “Nashville Moog” – from Trythall’s second album, Nashville Gold:

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"Cindy Electronium"
Zeroto180

“Cindy Electronium”: Shockingly Futuristic

Hard to believe this piece of music was made in 1959 – sounds quite contemporary to me: “Cindy Electronium“ Raymond Scott (1959) YouTube comments are almost universal in declaring Raymond Scott to be ahead of his time, with many remarking upon this recording’s resemblance to “chiptune” or “8 bit” (i.e.,

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"Mandolina"
Zeroto180

“Mandolinia” vs. The Remarkable Riderless Runaway Tricycle

Media Alert! A battle has suddenly erupted between two formidable foes who share a common sound — the analog synthesizer.  Not just any analog synthesizer sound, mind you, but a deep burbling one:  pulsating and insistent. In this corner, wearing a strangely intricate electronic eyepiece, we have Ronnie Montrose with

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"I Know You Aries"
Zeroto180

“I Know You Aries”: Mort Garson Asks, What’s Your Sign?

How nutty to release 12 albums of Moog synthesizer music simultaneously, one for each sign of the Zodiac.  And yet Mort Garson somehow convinced A&M to do so in 1969 – “I Know You Aries,”  the lead-off track on the Aries LP, could have been the A-side of a 45:

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"Raindrops Keep Fallin' On My Head"
Zeroto180

Sir Christopher Scott: Synthesizer Magician

During the 1970s when progressive rock, pop and soul were at their peak, a number of wizard keyboardists enjoyed superstar status:  Rick Wakeman, Keith Emerson, Stevie Wonder, Jan Hammer, Billy Preston, Jon Lord, Bernie Worrell. And Sir Christopher Scott. The liner notes for Sir Scott’s 1970 Decca LP, More Switched

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"Look at My Face"
Zeroto180

Look At Alan Price’s Face – But Be Sure To Listen To His Synth

Alan Price gets an intoxicating sound out of his trusty synthesizer on this lovely track from 1974’s Between Today and Yesterday on Warner Brothers: “Look at My Face“ Alan Price (1974) LP Musician & Production Credits Alan Price – Piano, Organ & Vocals Colin Green – Guitar Dave Markee – Bass

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