Zero to 180 – Three Minute Magic

Discoveries of a Pop Music Archaeologist

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Peter Green’s “Hidden Depth(s)”

Frankly, I’m surprised how little has been written about (original Fleetwood Mac guitarist) Peter Green‘s wondrous flight of fancy – “Hidden Depth” – a musical simulation of being strapped into a deep-sea submersible and dropped ever so slowly to the ocean’s bottom.  Marvel at the musical tranquility:

“Hidden Depth”      Peter Green     1970

Sounds a bit like the second set at a Grateful Dead concert with Jerry Garcia on lead guitar, does it not?

From an album whose title – The End of the Game – allegedly expressed Peter Green’s unambiguous intent to sever ties with the predatory and profit-driven “showbiz” machinery.  Seth at Julian Cope’s Head Heritage website, however, challenges the conventional wisdom that Green retired his guitar for 8 years or more upon completing his first solo album:

It’s a commonplace assumption that the The End Of The Game signaled on several levels not only a farewell by Green to the trappings of rock’n’roll stardom but a wholesale withdrawal from performing music altogether.  But Green did continue recording directly after the completion of The End Of The Game, contributing session guitar in a quick succession to records by Memphis Slim, Country Joe McDonald and even Toe Fat (their second album — not the one you and I bought and then consequently spent a weekend beating the floor with both head and hands at how an album with a cover so cool and grossed out could be such a full scale disappointment.)  Not to mention two further solo singles on Reprise before 1972 came and passed — roughly the period when Green’s retirement began, continuing for nearly the rest of the decade.

Front cover employs variant strain of the “future shock” typeface

Peter Green-aPeter Green-b

Seth also picks up on the Grateful Dead-isms, noting that “Nick Buck’s organ colourations [on “Hidden Depth”] take on the same role of melancholy as Rick Wright’s from “Mudmen” [Pink Floyd’s Obscured by Clouds] or Tom Constanten’s emerging springtime renewal in “Quadlibet For Tender Feet” off side one of [The Grateful Dead’s] Anthem Of The Sun.

You can also obtain “Hidden Depth” by somehow getting your hands on a copy of 1971 Warner Brothers sampler LP, Non-Dairy Creamer.

Non-Dairy Creamer LP

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