Zero to 180 – Three Minute Magic

Discoveries of a Pop Music Archaeologist

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Category: Plantation Records

David Allan Coe’s Trucker Tune

David Allan Coe, intriguingly, merits four full paragraphs in Neil A. Hamilton’s history of The 1970s: “Born in Ohio, Coe spent part of his youth in reform school and, in the 1960s, served time in the Ohio State Penitentiary.  Here was a man to whom the term outlaw meant more

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Sleepy’s “Asphalt Cowboy”: First & Best Version

Don’t be misled by the German 7-inch soundtrack companion whose A-side bears the dual title, “Midnight Cowboy-Asphalt Cowboy” — Ferrante & Teicher did not, in fact, release an early version of the truck-driving country classic, “Asphalt Cowboy” in 1969. Sleepy LaBeef, in truth, recorded the first – and greatest –

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“Cajun Interstate”: Cajun-Built

Thanks to the bibliographic notes in 2003’s The Cajuns:  Americanization of a People by Shane K. Bernard, I was able to affirm that “Cajun Interstate” by Rod Bernard is, indeed, about the building of the highway that traverses the bottom of Louisiana – Interstate 10: “Cajun Interstate”     Rod Bernard 

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“Understand Your Man”: Jimmy Dempsey Picks on Johnny Cash

Guitarist “Little” Jimmy Dempsey uses twin guitars to transform Johnny Cash’s “Understand Your Man” into a tuneful instrumental that bears little resemblance to the original – in a good way: “Understand Your Man”      Little Jimmy Dempsey     1970? This track can be found on 1970’s Little Jimmy Dempsey

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“Wave Bye Bye to the Man”: Good Riddance to Bad Man

Lynn Anderson’s ‘hard country’ take on “Wave Bye Bye to the Man” – a mother and child’s declaration of independence from a bad dad – provides a musical punch that perfectly matches the lyric: Interesting to hear Lawanda Lindsey’s version of the song from the previous year (1968) and notice

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“Proud Woman”: Unrequited Love’s Soulful Side

Shelby Singleton was someone who dared to be a little different from the rest of what Nashville was turning out in the late 60s and early 70s.  Singleton’s Plantation Records label enjoyed a great reputation for offbeat, funny tunes and wry social commentary, including early efforts by David Allan Coe,

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