Zero to 180 – Three Minute Magic

Discoveries of a Pop Music Archaeologist

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Category: Jazz

Freddie Roulette’s Sweet, Funky Steel

Freddie Roulette coaxes all manner of sweet, funky feeling out of his doubleneck lap steel guitar on the track “Joaquin” from his debut solo album: “Joaquin”     Freddie Roulette     1973 Steel Guitar:  Freddie Roulette Bass, Acoustic Guitar:  Victor Conte Drums:  Paul Lagos Guitar:  Coleman Head Saxophone:  Richard Aplanap Mixed by Fred

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King Records: Oddball Historical Tidbits

Triple Threat – the debut album by jazz multi-instrumentalist Roland Kirk – was originally released on the King label in 1956, rereleased on Bethlehem as Third Dimension, and on the Affinity label as Early Roots.  Kirk on tenor sax, stritch, manzello, & siren (!), with James Madison on piano, Carl

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“South Side Strut”: Grateful Funk

Today’s piece is a birthday tribute to my college roommate, Gavin Martin, who once rescued me from a very unpleasant housing situation, when he advocated successfully on my behalf for a vacancy that suddenly popped up in his much cooler adjoining dorm suite – and for that, I will be

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“Bumpin’ on Sunset”: Organ + Strings

Thanks to brother Bryan for tipping me to a book that, amazingly, has only been written in the last couple years:  Rock ‘n’ Roll Billboards of the Sunset Strip.  What took so long?  Sadly, most of us music fanatics who live on this side of the Mississippi have never had

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"Jamaican Boy"
Zeroto180

“Jamaican Boy”: Jazz Fusion Reggae Instrumental

Three musicians – Stanley Clarke, Jeff Beck, and Steve Gadd – with keyboard embellishments from a fourth, Bayeté Todd Cochran: “Jamaican Boy”     Stanley Clarke     1979 “Jamaican Boy” was a 45 release from 1979’s I Wanna Play for You studio/live hybrid LP and one of Record World‘s “Single Picks”

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“Countryside”: Jim Henson’s Word Jazz

Would love to know how Jim Henson, so early in his career, was able to get Frank Sinatra to conduct the orchestra backing him on his first single, a playful word jazz piece entitled, “The Countryside“: Jim Henson’s first (and only) 45 – released January, 1960 “Tick-Tock-Sick”, the B-Side, would

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“BluEmmons”: Landmark Steel Guitar Jazz

Just as Louis Jordan’s pairing of jump blues with country-style steel guitar was seen as a radical move in 1947, Buddy Emmons‘ decision to feature his masterful steel guitar stylings within a modern jazz context was considered equally bold in 1963 when Mercury released groundbreaking album, Steel Guitar Jazz.  “BluEmmons”

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“V.I.P.’s Boogie”: Duke Ellington Indulges in Some Name Calling

Thanks to WeirdWildRealm for the back story on a video performance that knocks me out every time I see it — The Duke Ellington Orchestra performing “V.I.P.’s Boogie” (fused to “Jam with Sam“) in a 1951 Snader transcription film: “VIP’s Boogie”     The Duke Ellington Orchestra     1951 Harry Carney:  bass

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Adrian Belew
Zeroto180

‘Sounds in Space’: Ken Nordine Revels in Stereo’s Wonder

This early stereo demonstration record by the fine folks at RCA Victor features spoken word parts by Ken Nordine (the maestro of “word jazz” – check out this ‘kinetic type’ animation clip for “Green” from Nordine’s Colors album) as between-song stereo banter.  The recordings, which feature mainly orchestral works (pop,

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