Zero to 180 – Three Minute Magic

Discoveries of a Pop Music Archaeologist

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Category: Shelby Singleton

“Hold It Baby”: Swedish Soul

Sweden’s Slam Creepers, judging solely by their name, sounds like a band of relatively recent vintage (e.g., 1980s hardcore?) — and yet, their first release, fascinatingly enough, was a split single in 1965:  a 7-inch flexi-disc in which shared Slam Creepers shared space with The Hollies and fellow Swedish band,

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"You Shakin' Things Up"
Zeroto180

“You Shakin’ Things Up”: Southern Soul Supreme

Here’s a tasty two-minute slice of southern soul from Robert (“Barefootin’“) Parker: “You Shakin’ Things Up”     Robert Parker     1969 1969’s “You Shakin’ Things Up” is the first of two singles for Shelby Singleton‘s Silver Fox and SSS International labels. Written by Robert Parker (Produced By Bob Robin For

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“Cajun Interstate”: Cajun-Built

Thanks to the bibliographic notes in 2003’s The Cajuns:  Americanization of a People by Shane K. Bernard, I was able to affirm that “Cajun Interstate” by Rod Bernard is, indeed, about the building of the highway that traverses the bottom of Louisiana – Interstate 10: “Cajun Interstate”     Rod Bernard 

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“A Woman’s World”: Feminist or Traditionalist?

Teresa Brewer – whose duet with Mickey Mantle, “I Love Mickey,” reached #87 in 1956 – would later record ever so briefly for Shelby Singleton.  June 1968’s “A Woman’s World” was the first of but two singles Brewer recorded for SSS International: The song initially gives the impression of threatening

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“Wave Bye Bye to the Man”: Good Riddance to Bad Man

Lynn Anderson’s ‘hard country’ take on “Wave Bye Bye to the Man” – a mother and child’s declaration of independence from a bad dad – provides a musical punch that perfectly matches the lyric: Interesting to hear Lawanda Lindsey’s version of the song from the previous year (1968) and notice

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“Proud Woman”: Unrequited Love’s Soulful Side

Shelby Singleton was someone who dared to be a little different from the rest of what Nashville was turning out in the late 60s and early 70s.  Singleton’s Plantation Records label enjoyed a great reputation for offbeat, funny tunes and wry social commentary, including early efforts by David Allan Coe,

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