George Barnes’ Halloween Guitar

George Barnes recorded a boss guitar instrumental – “Spooky” – that should be part of everyone’s Halloween soundtrack:

“Spooky”     George Barnes     1962

Billboard conferred three stars (“moderate sales potential) upon this B-side, as well as its A-side “Trainsville,” in their June 23, 1962 edition.  Exactly fifty years later, in 2012, someone would pay $126 for a copy of this record.

 Mercury promo/DJ 45

Link to Volume 1

I agree with 45Cat and (unwitting) Zero to 180 contributor, mickey rat, who declares George Barnes to be “an important but neglected figure in the development of American popular music” (not to mention, “one of the very first people to play electric guitar”).  Another 45Cat contributor, porcupine, notes the similarity between these two tracks and 1959’s Guitar: Twangy With a Beat album, recorded by Barnes using the nom de guerre, Dean Hightower (an alter ego solely on the ABC-Paramount label).

Dean Hightower:  The Back Story  [courtesy of Discogs]

Hi…I’m George Barnes’ daughter, and can tell you the history of this album.  It was a one-off for ABC-Paramount, who wanted to compete with Duane Eddy and — knowing my father could play anything, which he did as a NYC studio musician — asked him if he’d record something in that genre.  He didn’t want to associate his name with it, so took the pseudonym Dean Hightower as a joke.  The name’s a fake, but the stereo mix is real.  Some people love this album — but this is certainly not representative of his entire body of work!  I recently launched The George Barnes Legacy Collection, in case anyone here is interested in learning more about this jazz great and electric guitar pioneer:   https://georgebarneslegacy.com 

Cheers, Alexandra Barnes Leh

People have forked over considerable cash for George Barnes’ 1959 Country Jazz album, — as much as $250 and more.  But wait!  For just 1/10 of that amount, you can purchase the entire Country Jazz album remastered on compact disc, plus “rare selected tracks from the airchecks of Barnes’ early national radio performances on NBC’s Plantation Party.”   For those who prefer vinyl, Modern Harmonic has re-released Country Jazz in gatefold format that includes extended liner notes and images from the CD.

Rodney Gene Jr. plays “Hot Guitar Rag” from 1959’s Country Jazz album

What a kick in the pants to discover that YouTube does not yet have streaming audio available for Barnes’ debut 45 on Decca — “Hot Guitar Polka” (although you can hear its flip side “Clarinet Polka“, which was used as the theme song for Max Ferguson’s “Rawhide” Canadian radio program).   Fortunately, you can hear a great version of “Flintstones Theme” from the album Don’t Get Around Much Anymore, recorded live at Concord, California’s Willow Theater in 1977.

This Just In:  Zero to 180 has been informed by Alexandra Barnes Leh, producer of The George Barnes Legacy Collection, that a video for “Hot Guitar Polka” will be part of the promotional push for next year’s re-release of 1958’s Guitars By George! album.

1951 single release = Norway

Besides Country Jazz, the “George Barnes Quartet” recorded 1977’s Blues Going Up for the Concord Jazz label, as well as a series of lauded albums with cornetist, Ruby Braff.  Barnes’ obituary in the New York Times notes that this quartet made a “notable debut” at the 1973 Newport Jazz Festival, “winning most of the critical acclaim for the evening.”

Barnes and his Quartet first appeared on record as the backing band for Patti Page on “There’s A Man In My Life b/w “The First Time I Kissed You” – a 78 release from 1947 on the Mercury label.  The following year, the George Barnes Quartet would back Snooky Lanson on “Long After Tonight” b/w “Hearts Win, You Lose.”

Son of a gun — the label says “George Barnes Trio“!

In addition to his Quartet, Barnes has also fronted a 2nd Quartet (!), as well as Quintet, Sextet, OctetChorus and OrchestraGuitar Choir, and Gran Orquesta de Percusion, not to mention an orchestra jointly owned with bassist, Jack Lesberg.  Barnes also enjoyed renown as a Guitar Duo, first with Carl Kress, then with Bucky Pizzarelli (and his 7-string guitar) after Kress’s passing in 1965.  Did I mention that Barnes once led a Trio, who were mis-identified as a Quartet, even though it plainly says “Trioon the label?

“Organizing an octet of musicians from the Chicago Symphony, George created non-traditional jazz with the unusual instrumentation of electric guitar with clarinet, bass saxophone, English horn, oboe, flute, piccolo, piano, vibes, bass and drums.  The George Barnes Octet became a highly-acclaimed weekly feature on the ABC Radio Network.”   [excerpt from Art of Sound Gallery]

Audio LINK = “Baseball Baseball” (1954) – Barnes & his Quintet

George Barnes Album Covers on Parade

Grand Award — 1957

Decca — 1958

Mercury — 1960

Mercury — 1961/2

Mercury — recorded 1945

Mercury — 1962

Carney Records — 1963

Billboard‘s July 10, 1965 edition would include this “Pop Spotlight” review:

Two guitar wizards supplying all the music of a full orchestra.  The program is played to perfection, and includes much of the material Barnes and Kress performed at the White House Christmas Party last year.  With ease they segue from the mellow “Willow Weep for Me” to the sparkling “Girl Friend,” with a standard version of “Sentimental Journey” completing the bill. 

Ten Duets for Two Guitars — Kress & Barnes’ “Guitar Karaoke” LP – 1962

Note:  “On the even numbered tracks, there’s only the accompaniment played by C. Kress for ‘the home guitarist to join in.'”

Instructional LP – 1961

Collector’s note:  Highest prices paid for George Barnes vinyl?   Private label release of a “rare, impromptu” session of duets with pianist Ralph Sutton that have sold for $429 in 2015 and $371 in 2013.

Young Professional + Ubiquitous Session Guitarist

Q:  Do you have any idea how many recording dates you have played on?

A:  “Between 1951 and now, I have recorded 23 albums under my own name.  From 1953 to 1961, I recorded 61 albums with the Three Suns alone. From 1961 to the present, I have recorded with practically every bigname singing star from Frank Sinatra to Bing Crosby, Patti Page, and loads more.  It would be very difficult to find a singing star I haven’t recorded with.  They tell me down at the union, that I have recorded more than any other person in their contract file.  I don’t know how many recording dates I’ve done, but one day I intend to add them up.  I know the number is well into the thousands.”

“Georgie” Barnes — 1940

George Barnes:  King Records Alumnus

Zero to 180’s recent celebration of King’s jazz legacy points out that George Barnes played guitar for (who else) Earl Bostic on a Jan. 11, 1956 session that took place in NYC, with four songs recorded including “Bugle Call Rag”; “I Love You Truly” and “Cause You’re My Lover.”

Alexandra Barnes Lah notes:

“The George Barnes Estate receives no royalties from all of those European re-releases [mentioned above] … it’s a terrible and heartbreaking ripoff experienced by many American artists and their families.  But my relationship with Modern Harmonic is quite the opposite, for which I’m grateful.”

Bootleg EP – or – Just a Mirage?

It must have been the year before last when I was enjoying a madcap musical romp through Thailand and its wildly imaginative bootleg EP scene — 7-inch picture sleeves using filched images, with four songs often (but not always) by four different artists, produced in renegade fashion without regard for legal or copyright considerations [see “Oddball Beatles EPs Worldwide“].  It was early 2018, most likely, when I made that fateful decision to print out a decent quality scan of a bootleg EP that had made the curious call to bring together the bubblegum sounds of The Archies and 1910 Fruitgum Co. (plus early Dave Clark Five) with “agit-pop” from The Rolling Stones, “Street Fighting Man” — a song that was banned from radio (and whose provocative sleeve was immediately withdrawn) in 1968, a year in which assassination and rioting dominated headlines.

378×400 pixel version of image below

Coliseum = cheeky send-up of almighty Columbia Records (i.e., “Big Red“)

Track Listing

A1  “Street Fighting Man”   The Rolling Stones

A2  “Because”   The Dave Clark Five

B1  “Bang Shang-a-Lang”   The Archies

B2  “Goody Gum Drops”   1910 Fruitgum Co.

 

Don’t recall why I printed out this image in the first place, but here’s the weird thing —  Located this printout in my “scratch paper” pile and began to use it for correspondence, when the librarian in me prompted me to search the 45Cat database to affirm its existence but could no longer find it there … or anywhere else on the Internet!  This scanned image, therefore, is the world’s only proof of a bootleg EP from Thailand that was almost certainly released in 1968, possibly 1969.

Did I somehow dream up this EP release – Coliseum CLS 1080 – or was it, in fact, actually birthed?  45Cat allows users to easily browse a list of cataloged Coliseum releases, which has entries for two somewhat nearby catalog numbers, CLS 1087 (from 1969, we think) and CLS 1099 (released 1968, confusingly).

CLS 1087 = previously featured here          CLS 1099 = “Sugar Sugar” & friends

Evidence of Coliseum CLS 1080 EP’s existence:  If you Google the terms Coliseum + Archies + “CLS 1080” (as of October 10, 2019), Bill Rousell‘s music sales website will turn up in the search results, with a sales listing for this EP that names the four tracks in identical order.

Zero to 180, you might recall, had previously saluted The Archies five years ago in a piece that acknowledged 1968 to be a remarkably fertile time for truck driving country music.  The Rolling Stones (not to mention Stones sound-alike bands) have also been the focus of Zero to 180’s roving eye more than once over the years.

Rare UK picture sleeve, quickly withdrawn = sold for $17,100 in 2015!

Illicit Vinyl — No Laughing Matter

If the example of Thailand suits your warped sensibilities, you will also likely enjoy browsing the unauthorized vinyl output from the countries of MalaysiaIran & USSR.

           Decca US 451966                                  Decca Lookalike 45 = Malaysia

Furthermore, if you poke around 45Cat’s database in the section tagged asPoland,” you will quickly discover a vast underworld of “postcard discs” — sometimes plain, but often as not, “old-timey” renderings and travel scenes, as well as modernist art images, with one and sometimes two songs on a single-sided “sound postcard”!

All You Need Is Love” – The Beatles – Poland, 1967 = who knew?

Can you guess which early 60s instrumental hit (later covered by Sugar Hill Gang)?

Isn’t it obvious?  “Apache” by The Shadows = Polish postcard disc