Duke Ellington Meets Apollo 11

Eternal debt of gratitude to Larry Appelbaum of WPFW’s Sounds of Surprise program for pointing listeners (including myself) to a fascinating moment in our nation’s history about which not enough seems to have been written.

“Moon Maiden”     Duke Ellington Quartet @ ABC in NYC     July 21, 1969

A rather surreal television moment, as the Apollo 11 rocket lifts off in a video montage behind Duke Ellington that then dissolves into a shot of the moon.  “Moon Maiden” would be the regal bandleader’s debut vocal performance, amazingly enough, thus exquisitely underscoring the theme of Appelbaum’s program:  vocal performances from otherwise staunch instrumentalists.

Jazz Lives reports (via his “expert friends“) that Duke Ellington’s televised performance – with Al Chernet on guitar, Paul Kondziela on bass, and Rufus Jones on drums – had been “pre-recorded for the telecast.”

“Moon Maiden” had also been recorded just days earlier, July 14th, specifically, at NYC’s National Studio with only Duke Ellington on vocals and celeste (and finger snaps) — the version you will find as the kick-off track on 1977’s The Intimate Ellington.

Duke Ellington LP - Italy

Jet would include this report (“Ellington Pens Tune For Man’s First Moon Steps“) in their July 31, 1969 edition:

Duke Ellington,  composer-bandleader-pianist par excellence who has taken The A Train through the Air Conditioned Jungle to his Satin Doll, climbed musically aboard Apollo 11 with his specially composed song, Moon Maiden, for the Moon-bound astronauts.  The veteran musician, 70, whose musical composition is an accompaniment to man’s first steps on the moon, permitted himself a public first:  he sang as well as played the Moon Maiden tune.  The 10-minute composition for piano, bass, and drums, commissioned by ABC-TV for the network’s day-long broadcast of man’s first walk on the moon, says:

Moon Maiden.  Way out there in the blue … /
Moon Maiden.  Got to be with you /
I made my approach and then revolved /
But my big problem is still not solved /
Coming in loud and clear /
I’m just a fly-by-night guy, but for you … /
I might be quite the right–so right guy /
Moon Maiden.  Moon Maiden.  Maiden, you’re for me.

Asked why he composed a song about a “maiden” when the astronauts going to the moon are men, the veteran jazzman, surrounded by a set the simulated the lunar landing site, replied:  “For those cats to want to be there, there must be a chick around someplace.”  Onlookers and studio buffs who witnessed the musical taping said Duke didn’t “sound bad” as a singer.  Duke said this first vocal effort is his last.  A studio spokesman declared:  “It seemed appropriate–as man first sets foot upon the moon–that we should celebrate with music.”

Ken Vail’s invaluable reference, Duke’s Diary, points to September 4, 1969 as the day that “Duke Ellington and his Orchestra again record for Reader’s Digest in New York City” with the following musical personnel to record “Moon Maiden” — twice, including a version that features vocals from Duke himself — along with four other songs:

  • Duke Ellington:  Piano
  • Cat Anderson, Cootie Williams, Willie Cook & Lloyd Michaels:  Trumpets
  • Lawrence Brown, Benny Green & Chuck Connors:  Trombones
  • Russell Procope:  Alto Sax & Clarinet
  • Johnny Hodges & Norris Turney:  Alto Sax
  • Harold Ashby & Paul Gonsalves:  Tenor Saxes
  • Harry Carney:  Baritone Sax
  • Luther Henderson:  Piano
  • Wild Bill Davis:  Organ
  • Paul Kondziela:  Bass
  • Victor Gaskin:  Electric Bass
  • Rufus Jones:  Drums
  • Robert Collier:  Conga

Nine years after the moon landing, Luv You Madly Orchestra (on NYC’s Salsoul label) would bring out the untapped disco potential of Ellington’s original piece.

“Moon Maiden” was a B-SIDE, you know

Moon Maiden - Salsoul

Richard Jurek, in the February 15, 2017 edition of Smithsonian’s Air & Space, writes about this fascinating musical footnote in American aeronautical history, when an emerging TV network – with a reputation for “counterprogramming” against its competitors – commissioned a 10-minute vocal paean to our planet’s lone satellite to be broadcast to the entire nation.  Jurek also notes with amusement that our good friends at Pickwick did their level best to capitalize on the national sentiment in 1969 by churning out a covers album of ten popular “moon” songs.

Billy Vaughn LP on Pickwick

Seasons in Your Mind would go one step further and compile an annotated listing of other “moon-sploitation” albums from the year 1969 (although shamefully neglect to include the Journey to the Moon album released that same year by Cincinnati’s King Records).

Journey to the Moon - King LP

NASA, not to be outdone, has organized its own Lunar List of moon songs alphabetically, with Jimi Hendrix’s “And the Moon Pulls the Tides Gently, Gently Away” positioned first!

Zero to 180 is reminded of a time when television news had a modicum of dignity — although hard to say with a straight face as one spies the prominent product placement for Tang on the newscasters’ rostrum.

Tang:  Proud NASA Sponsor

Tang - Proud NASA SponsorBig tip of the hat to Aeolus 13 Umbra, who posted the above television clip from his own video archives and noted the striking juxtaposition of Duke Ellington with full-sized replicas of the Apollo 11 Command Module and Eagle Lunar Lander in ABC’s television studios.  Thank you also to Brent Hayes Edwards, who gets very specific about Ellington’s “Moon Maiden” (as well as “Spaceman“) in Epistrophies:  Jazz and the Literary Imagination:

“Ellington’s manuscript for ‘Moon Maiden’ is located in the Duke Ellington Collection, Subseries 1A:  Manuscripts, Box 229, Folder 8, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution.

Duke Ellington, ‘Spaceman,’ Duke Ellington Collection, Series 5:  Correspondence, Box 6, notes, undated, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution.”

TV Guide invites you to review the programming plans for each of the three major television networks during the week of July 19-25, 1969.

TV Guide - July 19, 1969Did you know? “Moon Maiden” is not Duke Ellington’s first musical brush with space travel — 1957’s double-LP Columbia release, A Drum Is a Woman, would include “Ballet of the Flying Saucers.”

Duke Ellington - flying saucersLink to Zero to 180’s previous piece that features Duke Ellington

“Fat Boy”: It’s the Organ

Billy Stewart was a Washington DC musical talent who backed Bo Diddley in the 1950s during Diddley’s Chess years.  Stewart would get the chance to make his own recordings on Chess in the early 1960s when the label hired a new A&R person, Roquel Davis.

Rick Simmons in Carolina Beach Music:  The Classic Years writes this about Stewart’s first 45 from 1962:

“His first recording was ‘Reap What You Sow” which went to #18 on the R&B charts and #79 on the Billboard Hot 100 … Perhaps more importantly the flip side of the record was a song [Roquel] Davis had asked Stewart to write and record based on his nickname ‘Fat Boy.’  Though ‘Fat Boy‘ did not chart, it got a fair amount of airplay and would become Stewart’s signature song”:

“Fat Boy”     Billy Stewart     1962

Incredibly, there’s another version of “Fat Boy” without this infectious organ track???

Wikipedia informs us that “Stewart was 12 years old when he began singing with his younger brothers Johnny, James, and Frank as The 4 Stewart Brothers, and later went on to get their own radio show every Sunday for five years at WUSTAM Radio Music Hall in Washington, DC.”   WUST is the present-day venerated music venue, 9:30 Club.  In the 1940s, this same building – incredibly enough – was a music club named for its co-owner, Duke Ellington (click on link to Washington Post piece).

DC’s 9:30 Club & its previous incarnations:  WUST-AM & Duke Ellington’s

[photo credits:  Brian Liu (top); Michael Horsley (middle); DC Public Library (bottom)]

9-30 ClubWUST Radio Music Hall IIIDuke Ellington's in DC

“V.I.P.’s Boogie”: Duke Ellington Indulges in Some Name Calling

Thanks to WeirdWildRealm for the back story on a video performance that knocks me out every time I see it — The Duke Ellington Orchestra performing “V.I.P.’s Boogie” (fused to “Jam with Sam“) in a 1951 Snader transcription film:

“VIP’s Boogie”     The Duke Ellington Orchestra     1951

Harry Carney:  bass clarinet
Jimmy Hamilton:  clarinet
Wade Cook:  trumpet
Paul Gonsalves:  tenor sax
Britt Woodman:  trombone
Russell Procope:  alto sax
Cat Anderson:  trumpet
Quentin Jackson:  toilet-plunger mute trombone
Willie Smith:  alto sax
Louis Bellson:  drums
Wendell Marshall:  bass

For the most part, these transcriptions, says WeirdWildRealm, “were recycled into sets of Snader & Studio telescriptions for syndication to television in half-hour bites, as trumped up concerts of sundry performers filmed between 1950 and 1954.  These always added an emcee (Willie Bryant) and comedians to connect the mini-movies into a whole.”

Furthermore, these soundtracks “were tinkered with a bit to provide audience reactions and ‘curtains’ were added, all designed to give the impression of concerts at the Apollo Theater, which, though unconvincing, has nevertheless fooled a lot of people ever since.  Duke’s portion were actually filmed at California Studios in Los Angeles.”

Columbia did issue a 10-inch single in 1952 of “V.I.P.’s Boogie” b/w with “Jam with Sam” that was recorded at the almighty label’s New York City studio on May 10, 1951.

VIP's Boogie 78-aVIP's Boogie 78-b

“C Jam Blues”: From the Father of Hillbilly Jazz

I had a nice laugh when I realized that this fiery little instrumental in the key of C was, indeed, not the world’s first waltz to be played outside of 3/4 time but instead an error in the track listing on the album jacket.  Thus, despite this song being listed as “Gravy Waltz,” I’m pretty certain this is actually the next track in the album’s running order — the jazz standard, “C Jam Blues” by Duke Ellington:

[Pssst:  Click the triangle above to play “C Jam Blues” as interpreted by Vassar Clements & Friends.]

Track comes from 1974’s double album, Hillbilly Jazz, by the “Father of Hillbilly Jazz” himself, Vassar Clements – who first appeared on the Grand Old Opry in 1949 fiddling with Bill Monroe – joined by D.J. Fontana on drums, Doug Jernigan on steel guitar, David Bromberg on guitar, and other musical friends.

Hillbilly Jazz LP

Vassar Clements:  Fiddle, Viola & Vocals
D.J. Fontana:  Drums
Doug Jernigan:  Steel Guitar, Resonator Guitar
David Bromberg:  Guitar
Michael Melford:  Guitar, Mandolin & Piano
Ellis Padgett:  String Bass
Kenneth Smith:  Electric Bass
Benny Kennerson:  Piano
Gordon Terry:  Vocals

Hillbilly Jazz was issued on Flying Fish.  While Clements’ music mostly enjoyed release on independent, folk-oriented labels (Rounder, Old Homestead, Mind Dust, Flying Fish), Vassar did manage to release a few 45s on a couple major labels of note:

Vassar Mercury 45 IVassar Mercury 45 IIVassar MCA 45aVassar MCA 45b

The Barclay Stars: Five French Guitars

The album cover would seem to say it all —Les Barclay Stars - Guitars Unlimited

but the liner notes reveal that this is not just any ordinary guitar army:

This album was recorded in France.  It spotlights the work of five of France’s outstanding guitarists:  Francis Le Maguer (musical director), Pierre Cullaz, Raymond Gimenes, Paul Piguillem, and Victor Apicella.  This is the first record on which they have played together as an orchestra.  These five guitarists form the “Barclay Stars Orchestra” in which the guitars play the trumpet, trombone and saxophone parts of a conventional orchestra.

Although this 1966 album proudly bears the Atco imprint from front to back, Atlantic Records is simply serving as the American distributor for a work that was originally recorded in Paris by Barclay Records in glorious monophonic sound (for best results, observe the R.I.A.A. high frequency roll off characteristic with a 500 cycle crossover).

The album leans heavily toward traditional jazz, with a healthy dollop of Duke Ellington   (“In a Mellow Tone”; “Sophisticated Lady”; “Satin Doll” & Strayhorn’s “Take the A Train”) and a pinch of Woody Herman (“Early Autumn”), balanced by more contemporary fare via Neal Hefti (“Flight of the Foo Birds” & “Fantail”) and Horace Silver (“Opus de Funk”).

Check out this toe-tapping jazz standard, “Four Brothers,” composed by Jimmy Guiffre and brought to life originally by the Woody Herman Orchestra:

Four Brothers – The Barclay Stars

[Pssst:  Click on the triangle to play “Four Brothers” as picked by The Barclay Stars.]

One and Done?

It appears that Guitars Unlimited would be the first and only guitar summit from five of France’s finest — an outcome whose likelihood was signaled in the last sentence of the liner notes by the phrase, “chances are”:

“The sound they generate is so unusual that chances are there will be many more albums by the Barclay Stars.”

“Caravan”: Ferlin Husky’s Band Cuts Loose

Reissue label Razor & Tie did a public service in 1999 when they rescued a wonderful instrumental that had remained unissued for over 30 years – just sitting on a master tape of a 1965 Nashville recording session by country singer, Ferlin Husky.  Very little is known about the musicians who did this blazing hillbilly jazz version of “Caravan” except that the steel player is almost certainly Curly Chalker.  Surprisingly tight arrangement and crisp ending for something that was simply considered a between-song “jam”:

This previously unissued recording courtesy of Swing West – Volume 2:  Guitar Slingers.