Del Shannon’s ‘Lost’ 1967 Album

Billy Nicholls, staff writer for Andrew Loog Oldham’s Immediate Records, would pen three songs for Del Shannon‘s album, Home & Away, 11 tracks that were recorded in February of 1967 at London’s Olympic Studio but shelved until the release of 1978’s … And the Music Plays On, an LP released only in the UK and Australia.  Here in the US, Liberty ended up releasing from these sessions  (“the best album Marianne Faithfull never made,” according to the aforementioned Rob Chapman) a total of just three tracks across a pair of 45s (“Led Along” b/w “I Can’t Be True” plus “Runaway ’67” b/w “He Cheated“) issued in 1967.

What a loss for radio in pop’s peak year of 1967, as today’s featured song “My Love Has Gone” somehow got overlooked by Immediate and Liberty as an obvious A-side:

“My Love Has Gone”     Del Shannon     1967

Nicholls would join Shannon’s heavyweight backing band for these sessions, along with Steve Marriott, John Paul Jones, Nicky Hopkins, Andy White, Twice as Much, and Pat ColeP.P.Arnold, (who was featured last year by Zero to 180 on the cusp of her first ever Australian tour).

Discogs includes a catalog record for a single-sided 7-track acetate on which “My Love Is Gone” serves, fittingly, as the final track:

“One-sided, 7-song Demo Acetate test pressing for Del Shannon’s unreleased 1967 album Home & Away, recorded for Immediate in the UK with a stellar backing line-up (Billy Nicholls, etc.).  This was likely Del Shannon’s personal copy because at the end of Track 3, “Cut And Come Again,” an engineer adds a joking voice-over “Hey, Del – you blew the words!,” which is missing on the later re-released versions of the album.  This appears to be the only actual pressing of the album (actually, half the album) from when it was recorded in 1967.  No label or trail-off markings, but acetate is clearly seven songs from Home & Away when listened to.”

Rumor has it this was the original LP cover

American fans finally got their chance to obtain Home & Away (whether or not they realized it), when all 11 songs ended up sandwiched in the sequencing (tracks 12-22) for 1991 compilation Del Shannon:  The Liberty Years — with all recordings mixed in stereo and “mastered from the original 4- and 8-track master session tapes.”  In 2012, Home & Away finally enjoyed a proper release on compact disc – though only in the UK – supplemented by mono singles mixes of five tracks.

Known to his mum as Charles Weedon Westover (born in Grand Rapids, Michigan), Del Shannon – as Discogs contributor RoryHoy would have you know – is “one of the most seriously underrated talents in Pop Music history.”   And furthermore —

While most 1960’s boffins know his song “Runaway”, there’s a whole 30 years worth of amazing music from this man.  With his incredible voice complete with trademark falsetto and of course his fantastic songwriting, what is there not to like with this guy.  If you like Elvis, Buddy Holly, The Beatles etc — Del is much recommended!

“My Love Has Gone” (composed, not by Nicholls but rather, by Ross Watson, the songwriter’s sole contribution to pop music, possibly) – enjoyed a new lease on life in 2014, thanks to a 7-inch winner of a release by Miriam, i.e., Miriam Linna, founder – along with Billy Miller – of Norton Records, as well as the original drummer for The Cramps.

Miriam Speaks With Zero to 180:
My Love Has Gone45

Miriam Linna was kind enough to chat with Zero to 180, who called to inquire the reason for choosing this particular song from Shannon’s Home and Away as the A-side of her debut 45 (not to mention kick-off track for 2014’s Nobody’s Baby), a recording session that began as a special offer to work with Sam Elwitt, Nutley Brass producer [who can ever forget his fun and imaginative arrangements of “Beat On the Brat” and other Ramones classics?], as well as musician.

Linna, who rates Shannon as the most “charismatic” performer in her estimation, identifies Shannon’s 1967 Home and Away sessions as one of her all-time favorite albums — a “complex” set of songs, in terms of composition, artistry, and production.  Elwitt, who was hoping to evoke the sound of Hollywood’s legendary Gold Star studio (Pet Sounds, et al) with this project, invited Linna to choose the songs.  Miriam’s husband, Billy Miller, was ill at the time she had selected “My Love Has Gone,” though Linna fully believed he would pull through.  However, when Miller unexpectedly passed in 2016, the song suddenly took on an unintended poignancy.

“My Love Has Gone”     Miriam Linna     2014

Linna, in fact, had listened to the Home and Away album two days prior to my phone call from start to finish — a moving experience.  In terms of emotional directness to the listener through “the magic of records,” Shannon possesses a gift that brings to Linna’s mind one other artist — Bobby Jameson (featured by Zero to 180 in 2014).  And the “common thread” linking these two artists, Linna points out, is the A&R visionary Andrew Loog Oldham, whose ability to “match songs with artists” was a big part of his genius.

Rhino Records co-founder and one-time Del Shannon manager, Dan Bourgoise, was immediately smitten by Linna and Elwitt’s rendition and urged her to cover “another Del Shannon song.”  Miriam and Sam would collaborate on another Norton 45 the following year, this time breathing new life in “The Hand Don’t Fit the Glove,” a great UK 45 by Terry Reid (with Peter Jay’s Jaywalkers) from 1967.  Both singles from 2014 and 2015 are still available at Norton’s website, along with lots of other cool vinyl.

Check out: “David Fricke Remembers Norton Records’ Billy Miller:  Tireless Rock and Roll Foot Soldier” – published in the November 18, 2016 edition of Rolling Stone.  Tributes, as well, from New York Times, Billboard, Pitchfork, and Bloodshot Records’ Rob Miller.

Billy Nicholls Debut Album: 
Limited Issue Yields IMPRE$$IVE Auction Prices Decades Later

One year after the Del Shannon sessions, Immediate, sadly, “left in the can” Nicholls’s grand opus, Would You Believe, an album highly prized by collectors though essentially unreleased “save for a few promo copies” (according to The MOJO Collection).  Note the four and five figures paid for a UK 1st edition mint condition — as high as £8,000 (i.e., over $11,000).

In 2017, Discogs contributor Grippo would remark on the artistic merits of Would You Believe – “the third most expensive record that’s ever been sold in the Discogs marketplace” – for a piece entitled Top 30 Most Expensive Records Sold in April Topped by Billy Nicholls (I happened to enjoy the tuba/banjo bit myself).

How tragically odd that not one but two LP-length responses to Pet Sounds from the same label would be kept under wraps for years before eventually finding acclaim.

“God Only Knows”: Italian A-Side

Rob Chapman – in his review of the 6-CD box set Immediate Singles Collection for the June, 2000 edition of Mojo – takes issue with with the choice of tracks regarding American vocalist, Pat Cole “P.P.” Arnold (who kicked off her solo singing career in mid-60s UK), demanding to know “where is her ecstatic version of [Brian Wilson & the Beach Boys’] ‘God Only Knows‘?”:

“GOD ONLY KNOWS”     P.P. ARNOLD     1968

“God Only Knows” would be sequenced just after the opening track on side one of 1968’s Kafunta album, which enjoyed distribution in the UK, US, Germany, Netherlands, Spain, South Africa, Canada, and Japan.  Arnold’s version of the standout track from The Beach Boys’ groundbreaking Pet Sounds would spend its entire existence confined to the album — except, however, in Italy (and nowhere else), where “God Only Knows” nobly served as the A-side of a 1969 single release.

RILASCIATO SOLO IN ITALIA

PP Arnold 45-a2The reverse side of the Italian picture sleeve includes jukebox title card – plus photo!

PP Arnold 45-bbThere is a page on the Smiley Smile chatboard devoted to this recording in which one of the members makes the following observation:

“But seriously folks, this is pretty much a song no one should cover.  In doing a cover version you either do something completely different with the song and/or top the original.  The latter is as close to zero chance as you’ll get, and the former not likely to work considering the power of the original arrangement [#2 Pop – 14 weeks on the charts].  That said, P.P. does a decent job – doesn’t embarrass herself.”

An original copy of the 1969 Italian picture sleeve sold at auction in 2012 for 20 Euros.

This just in:  Arnold’s “lost” album of songs recorded in the late 1960s/early 1970s – The Turning Tide – was finally released last August, as reported by Billboard.  “Derek” (i.e., Eric Clapton) and the Dominoes (Bobby Whitlock, Jim Gordon and Carl Radle, along with Jim Price & Bobby Keys) served as backing musicians on three of the songs, while Madeline Bell, Doris Troy, and Rita Coolidge share vocals with Arnold on other tracks (with Clapton, Barry Gibb, Caleb Quaye and Arnold serving variously and/or collaboratively as producer).

“The First Lady of Immediate Records” (who was gracious enough to share this history piece on her Facebook page!) is about to embark upon her first ever concert tour of Australia – tour dates listed on the official poster below:

[CLICK on IMAGE BELOW TO VIEW IN HIGH RESOLUTION]

Bonus Track
“God Only Knows”:  Rare LP-Only Version

Thanks to Smiley Smile for pointing Zero to 180 toward another notable (pop) “soul” cover of the classic Beach Boys track “God Only Knows“:   Philadelphia’s own, Brenda & the Tabulations:

“God Only Knows” would serve as the third track on side one of 1967’s Dry Your Eyes.

Sealed for everyone’s protection

The Poets: Not Actual 12-Strings

The ringing, echo-drenched electric 12-string guitars on the debut single by Scottish rockers, The Poets, are such a striking sound for 1964 and yet a strangely familiar one:  might it be possible that the band later reincarnated as Brian Jonestown Massacre?

“Now We’re Thru'”     The Poets     1964
[play at strong volume]

What a revelation when one finds out – thanks to Richie Unterberger’s interview with lead singer and songwriter, George Gallacher – “apparently, there were no 12-string guitars, but what there was, was the two guitars having the 1st and 2nd strings tuned the same, thereby creating a semi-12 string effect.”  That very same year interestingly enough, Lou Reed would take this concept to the ultimate extreme when he tuned all six strings to the same note for his satiric (non) dance hit “The Ostrich.”

Now We're Thru - The Poets 45

With the utmost of commitment from each and every band member, “Now We’re Thru’” is a classic A-side from top to bottom, with the chiming guitars – and particularly the lonely vocal at song’s end – ratcheting up the mystery and angst. The song would find release in Japan (manufactured by the “otherKing Records), as well as the US, Australia, and the UK, where the song charted at #31, doing particularly well in Scotland, confirms Unterberger in his (revised) history of ‘overlooked innovators and eccentric visionaries’ — Urban Spacemen and Wayfaring Strangers.

Billboard‘s December 12, 1964 edition gives the back story on the single’s release here in the States:

Bob Crewe, independent record producer, has formed his own label, Dynovox, which will be distributed by Amy-Mala Records.

The label’s first release is ‘Now We’re Thru” by the Poets.  Crewe is currently producing sides for the 4 Seasons, and current releases ‘Watch Out Sally‘ by Diane Renay on MGM; ‘Dusty‘ by the Rag Dolls on Amy-Mala; newcomer Michael Allen on MGM Records with ‘She,’ and the forthcoming Travey Dey release on Amy-Mala.

The New Crewe label will not confine its efforts to pop releases.  The New York Youth Symphony and show and movie scores are being recorded for future releases.”

Unterberger attributes much of the “brilliance” of The Poets’ singles to their manager/producer, Andrew Loog Oldham, and proclaims the band to be “certainly the most talented act in Oldham’s production/management stable other than the Stones.”  According to a November, 1964 edition of New Music Express, the band’s name is “presumably derived from the fact that they wear their hair Burns-style and have ruffled lace-fronted shirts.”

After recording two singles for Oldham’s Immediate label, The Poets would carry on for one more single after Gallacher’s departure – 1967’s “Wooden Spoon” – before disbanding.  Wait a minute, 1967 is the birth year for Anton Newcombe:  coincidence or musical reincarnation?

The Poets would reunite in 2011 for a live performance at Glasgow’s Eyes Wide Open club.  Tip of the hat (yet again) to Tom Avazian for hipping me to this track via UK anthology album from 1983:  20 One-Hit Wonders, Volume 2.

1968 Crown Durango Electric 12-String [courtesy of Drowning in Guitars]

Electric 12-String = 1968 Crown Durango

{double click on image above for 3-D centerfold effect}

 

Historical Sidebar:  First Electric 12-String Guitar on UK Recording

Tony Bacon’s Rickenbacker Electric 12 String, The Story of The Guitars, The Music, and The Great Players informs who the electric 12-string pioneers in the UK were:

In fact, [George] Harrison’s Rickenbacker wasn’t the first electric 12-string on a British recording session.  That honour belongs to a Burns guitar played by Hank Marvin of The Shadows.  Marvin, a Fender Stratocaster player, had teamed up with British guitar-maker, Jim Burns, to design a new solid-body six-string electric.  Burns also came up with an electric 12-string, and around October, 1963, Marvin received an early sample of the Burns Double Six.  He took it along to various sessions at EMI’s Abbey Road studios in London where he was recording with Cliff Richard & The Shadows.

Marvin intended to record “Don’t Talk to Him” using the Burns 12, but problems arose, so instead he doubled a six-string line to achieve the prominent hookline.  A few weeks later, however, he recorded another Cliff session and played the prototype Burns 12-string for “On The Beach.”  Unusually, the 12 was strung like a six-string bass plus octave strings, clearly heard on the song’s low-down double string runs.  Later in November, Marvin used the Burns 12 with regular stringing for “I’m the Lonely One.”  These Cliff Richard songs weren’t released until 1964 — in the UK singles chart, “I’m the Lonely One” went to Number 8 in February and “On the Beach” to 7 in July — but they are important as early British recordings of the electric 12-string sound.

The book goes on to say:

The very first release of a British record with electric 12-string — just ahead of The Beatles and well ahead of Cliff & The Shads — was the result of another Abbey Road session.  Paul McCartney gave one of his songs to Peter & Gordon, a new duo signed to EMI.  They recorded their single “A World Without Love” at Abbey Road in January 1964, with sessionman Vic Flick [of James Bond theme fame] on guitar.
 .

Rare 1965 Jimmy Page B-Side

No doubt about it:  Jimmy Page, given his role as composer, arranger, and producer, dominates this B-side by a group you’ve never heard of (i.e., recording career = exactly one 45).  This song, I am now discovering, is virtually unknown to American fans of Page’s work, as it has mainly enjoyed release in the UK and Europe — first as a B-side, and later on compilation albums that showcase the daring and original music produced by UK’s renegade indie label, Immediate.  Even now, when you search YouTube, the song barely registers:  just one lonely audio clip, with a mere 1,707 listens to date.

Will you please tell us the song title already?!  “Just Like Anyone Would Do” — the B-side to “Bells of Rhymney” on the one and only single ever released by Fifth Avenue:

Fifth Avenue     “Just Like Anyone Would Do”     1965

From the flamenco-style guitar riff that propels the song, to the instrumental bridge with the majestic piano chording, to the ghostly backing vocals that linger after the rest of the mix has faded, there’s something fairly compelling about this song (ditto for another great Jimmy Page production from that same year that unfairly sank without a trace — Nico’s “I’m Not Sayin’“).

I first encountered this haunting track on a double-album anthology of Immediate singles (with album sides devoted to “The Most Obvious”; “The Rarest of the Rare”; “Happy to Be a Part of the Industry of British Blues”; and “Jimmy Page Productions/Sessions”) that was released, oddly enough, by Nashville-based Compleat Records in 1985.

Immediate Singles 2-LP AnthologySix years prior, the Led Zeppelin fan club Manchester/UK had gathered this B-side and 29 other tracks for a double album compilation entitled, James Patrick Page — Session Man.  In recent years, “Just Like Anyone Would Do” would be reissued on CD in 2000, both in the UK (here and also here) and Germany.  2007 would also find the song included on a European CD release, Your Time Is Gonna Come — The Roots of Led Zeppelin (1964-1968).

Led Zep Roots Anthology

The track listing in 2000’s 6-CD box set, The Immediate Singles Collection, provides this sparse bit of text about Fifth Avenue’s sole contribution to popular music history:

45 originally released as Immediate IM 002 — 1965.
Line-up:  Denver Gerrard (vcls, gtr), Kenny Rowe (vcls, bs).
Band origin:  London.

The original Immediate 45 (which was the second single issued by the label, following “Hang On Sloopy” by The McCoys) does respectable business, according to Popsike, at auction.

Bonus Track!   John Paul Jones’ First 45

Would you be startled to learn that John Paul Jones’s career as a solo artist goes as far back as 1964, with the release of his Andrew Loog Oldham-produced Pye 45 “Baja” (Lee Hazlewood‘s brilliant surf hit for The Astronauts) b/w “A Foggy Day in Vietnam“?

“Baja”     John Paul Jones     1964

In 2017, someone would pay $375 for a promo copy of Jones’s debut 45.

The Musical Equivalent of Recess

Amen Corner is one group who has managed to capture the joy of unstructured play time at school — that midday break known as “Recess“:

“Recess”     Amen Corner      1969

This song has particular meaning for me, as I am a PTA parent who is heading up a Recess Committee to improve the quality of the daily playtime experience at my children’s school.

That’s Andy FairweatherLow, by the way, vocalizing a song he himself did not compose (that would be a gentleman by the surname of Henderson) but one he did, nonetheless, produce, along with (early Kinks/Who producer) Shel Talmy, for the entire 1969 album, Farewell to the Real Magnificent Seven, on which “Recess” appears.

Fun to point out that this song never saw single release, except as the B-side of a 45 released in New Zealand.

Recess NZ 45“Recess” can also be found on a 1969 sampler album of tracks from renegade indie label, Immediate, that bears the wry title, Happy to Be a Part of the Industry of Human Happiness.

Immediate LP

“Think”: Squeezing Soul From a Stone

I had assumed lots of people were already familiar with Chris Farlowe’s kicking mod soul version of Jagger & Richard’s “Think” – but viewership numbers on YouTube tell otherwise:

“Think” wisely enjoyed release in India and Sweden, as well as its native UK, where it went to #37 on Andrew Loog Oldham’s Immediate label.  “Think” is also the kick-off track on Farlowe’s 1966 LP, 14 Things to Think About.

14 Things and Yet Only 10 Faces – What Gives?

Chris Farlowe LP

“Mary Anne”: UK Countrypolitan

Legendary producer/engineer, Glyn Johns (The Who, Faces, Belly, Joe Satriani) gets behind the mic to sing this tuneful slice of British-flavored countrypolitan, “Mary Anne“:

Produced, arranged and conducted by – not Johns – but rather, Tony Meehan, drummer of premier UK instrumental outfit, The Shadows, and released in 1965 on Immediate, the independent label started by Rolling Stones’ manager, Andrew Loog Oldham, along with Tony Calder.

Mary Anne - Glyn Johns 45

Johns’ one and only Immediate 45 has commanded healthy prices at auction in recent years.