Zero to 180 – Three Minute Magic

Discoveries of a Pop Music Archaeologist

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Month: August 2014

“Summertime’s Another Name for Love”: Pizzicato in Pop

Chicago’s New Colony Six released seven singles on the Mercury label from 1967-1970. “Summertime’s Another Name for Love,”  from 1968’s Revelations album, sounds like an obvious A-side to me – and yet it ended up being the B-side to “Can’t You See Me Cry.”  I especially enjoy the tantalizingly brief

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“Nosey Joe”: Where Version Meets Dub

[Note:  Third in a triptych of pieces about songs named Joe] Technically, this near-instrumental is what’s known as “version” (as opposed to dub’s full-on, all-out adventurousness), though fortunately, this mix is enlivened by light dub treatments that follow the playful spoken word opening: “Nosey Joe Version”      Niney All-Stars 

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“Ode to Big Joe”: Big Joe Talbot, That’s Who

Thanks to the contributor of YouTube’s only audio clip of “Ode to Big Joe,” I now know which country singers are being affectionately parodied by The Willis Brothers in this song. Question:  Can you close your eyes and identify the four country legends being spoofed? Answer:   Hank Snow (the song’s

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“Killer Joe”: Nashville Super Pickers in Austin

In this 1979 performance from TV’s Austin City Limits, Buddy Emmons (steel guitar) and Phil Baugh (electric guitar) take The Nashville Super Pickers for a test drive using the Benny Golson jazz standard, “Killer Joe,” as their vehicle: Buddy Emmons:  Steel Guitar & Vocals Phil Baugh:  Lead Guitar Russ Hicks: 

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“BluEmmons”: Landmark Steel Guitar Jazz

Just as Louis Jordan’s pairing of jump blues with country-style steel guitar was seen as a radical move in 1947, Buddy Emmons‘ decision to feature his masterful steel guitar stylings within a modern jazz context was considered equally bold in 1963 when Mercury released groundbreaking album, Steel Guitar Jazz.  “BluEmmons”

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“New York’s My Home”: Gordon Jenkins ♥ NYC

Gordon Jenkin’s paean to The Big Apple, 1946’s Manhattan Tower — which combines narration, dialogue, sound effects & mood music, along with the songs themselves — was a bold step forward, artistically speaking, for the phonographic medium.  Could this be one of vinyl’s first “concept albums”?  [Wikipedia cites Woody Guthrie’s

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“V.I.P.’s Boogie”: Duke Ellington Indulges in Some Name Calling

Thanks to WeirdWildRealm for the back story on a video performance that knocks me out every time I see it — The Duke Ellington Orchestra performing “V.I.P.’s Boogie” (fused to “Jam with Sam“) in a 1951 Snader transcription film: “VIP’s Boogie”     The Duke Ellington Orchestra     1951 Harry Carney:  bass

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“C Jam Blues”: From the Father of Hillbilly Jazz

I had a nice laugh when I realized that this fiery little instrumental in the key of C was, indeed, not the world’s first waltz to be played outside of 3/4 time but instead an error in the track listing on the album jacket.  Thus, despite this song being listed as

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“Mighty Time”: New Riders + Sly Stone & Jerry Garcia

Oh, what a mighty find at the local thrift shop last week — the title track from this 1975 album by New Riders of the Purple Sage – with special guests, Sly Stone and Jerry Garcia: “Mighty Time”     New Riders of the Purple Sage with Sly & Jerry   

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“Love Is Only Sleeping”: 7/4 Time Can Be Catchy

22 Words has a fun piece that identifies 6 prominent pieces of pop propelled by unusual time signatures, the most famous likely being Pink Floyd’s “Money,” whose opening bass line is played in 7/4 time. I’m always surprised when the topic of The Monkees comes up in conversation, and I

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