Paul Beaver Played Clavinet, Too

Remember last month when I was hot on the trail of identifying the first recording of a clavinet, thanks to a tip from Jim Kimsey: “Six O’Clock” by John Sebastian & The Lovin’ Spoonful?  Was John Sebastian‘s “electric harpsichord” (as he referred to the instrument), in fact, a clavinet?  Sebastian himself was gracious enough to respond to this historian-in-training:

“It was a Hohner Clavinet.  My father [John B. Sebastian] was a concert chromatic harmonica player, so I was way inside when it came to Hohner (I played with Matt Hohner’s kids.)   I may have had one of the first, due also to the band’s success.”

I cannot help but imagine the incredible array of harmonicas between the two households. Fun to note how musical advertising from around this time was so refreshingly fun and uncomplicated.

Hohner ad-iiHohner ad-i

Hohner ad-charlie mccoyHohner ad-johnny cash

Throwing a musical bone to Paul Guinnessy here

Hohner ad-astronautGuess who else was in on the ground floor with the clavinet?  If you guessed Paul Beaver, because his name is in the title of this piece, you would be correct!   Zero to 180 is eternally thankful to the Bob Moog Foundation for all the fascinating (and free) history on its website.  As Thom Holmes writes:

“One can’t help but notice that nine of the first ten Moog albums had one person in common—musician Paul Beaver.  By late 1966, he and Bernie Krause had pooled their funds to buy a Moog Modular of their own.  Beaver was designated as Moog’s West Coast Representative and together, he and Krause operated a company called Parasound that provided consulting, recording, and production services using the Moog Modular and other instruments.  Beginning in April of 1967, he and Bernie were recruited to bring the Moog Synthesizer to a variety of recording sessions.  These first Moog productions from the April 1967 time-frame began to appear on vinyl by May and June 1967.  Another burst of activity occurred after Beaver and Krause set up a booth to demonstrate the Moog at the Monterey Jazz Festival in June 1967, leading to several sessions with rock groups including the Doors and The Monkees.  By January, however, you still only needed ten fingers to count the number of records featuring the Moog.”

Photo of Paul Beaver – courtesy Bob Moog Foundation

Paul BeaverVibraphonist Emil Richards would pull off a birthstone concept with his New Sound Element “Stones” album from 1967:  twelve songs, one for each astrological gemstone.  Surprisingly little has been written about this early Moog album that still fetches decent scratch on the second-hand market.

Clavinet, what clavinet?  And yet it says right there in the musician credits – Paul Beaver, clavinet, as well as Moog.  All I hear is the Moog.

“Diamond”     Emil Richards     1967

Was New Sound Element, in fact, recorded prior to February, 1967 — the release date of the debut album by The Left Banke, whose “Let Go of You Girl” appears to be the first clavinet on a pop record?   Almost certainly not, as recordings with Beaver & Krause’s new Moog only began that April.  Nevertheless, Emil Richards’ “Stones” album would be the third recording ever to feature the Moog modular synthesizer, according to Holmes:

“Although Paul Beaver set-up the Moog, Richards was actively engaged in experimenting with the synthesizer for this session.  Richards told me that, ‘Beaver assisted as programmer for these sessions.  I played the synthesizer and all mallet instruments on all twelve tracks.’

This is the first commercial recording to credit the ‘Moog Synthesizer’ by name.”

In 2011 NPR’s Weekend Edition put together a feature piece on “Tinseltown’s Timekeeper” — Emil Richards — who would perform the finger snaps for The Addams Family TV theme, bongos for Mission Impossible‘s theme song, xylophone on The Simpsons‘ opening theme, and endless other sessions as one of the top percussionists working on the West Coast.

Photo of Emil Richards courtesy of NPR

Emil Richards-x

Selected Emil Richards Sessionography

Also worth noting that Richards played on one of my wife’s favorite albums – Queen Latifah’s Dana Owens Album from 2004.  The following year, Richards would help Paul Anka recast contemporary rock (e.g., “Smells Like Teen Spirit“) in swing band fashion (á la In a Metal Mood, Pat Boone’s rebranding effort from 1997) via 2005’s Rock Swings.

Richards is still musically active — follow him on Facebook why doncha?

Garlic in Popular Music

There are a considerable number of people on this planet who are not yet aware of the existence of a restaurant – The Stinking Rose – that celebrates the garlic bulb in all its glory, with garlic infused into the majority of the menu offerings.  With only two locations (one in Beverly Hills, the other in San Francisco), I’m afraid this dream destination will simply have to remain one for the indefinite future for many of us.

In the meantime, I will to have content myself with garlic-themed music for my soul food.      But do songs about garlic exist?  Here’s what Zero to 180’s investigation turned up.

As it turns out, garlic songs – at least here in the States – are at least as old as the blues.  Sylvester Weaver‘s “Garlic Blues” from 1927, it bears noting, will turn 100 in 11 years:

“Garlic Blues”     Helen Humes with Sylvester Weaver & Walter Beasley     1927

Not much else would appear for a couple decades, it seems, until The Max Brüel Quartet from Denmark released their jazz instrumental composition in 1955, “Garlic Wafer.”

“Garlic Wafer” by The Max Brüel Quartet – side one, track 2

Garlic 45-b 1966 would bring another garlic sighting, when Capitol subsidiary label, Tower, released its single “(Get Off That) Booze & Garlic Bread” by garage rocker, Denny Rockwell.

This 45 deserves, if not partial credit, at least an asterisk

Garlic 45-aGarlic 45-aa

Two years later, vibraphonist Mike Mainieri and his Quartet would channel the spirits, and beat John Lennon to the punch in the process, with the wryly-titled “Instant Garlic” from the group’s 1968 album, Insight.

Instant garlic’s gonna get you — gonna knock you right on the head

Garlic LP-bb1972 would see the release of NRBQ‘s (Eddie Kramer-produced) Scraps, a wide-ranging album that would include the whimsical and dadesque “Who Put the Garlic in the Glue.”

“Who Put the Garlic in the Glue” by NRBQ – back when the Q stood for Quintet

NRBQ LP-a[42 years later, Lin Brehmer from Chicago’s CBS affiliate XRT would single out NRBQ’s “Who Put the Garlic in the Glue” for her October 22, 2014 ‘Hump Day Unusual Moment‘ segment.]

Sometime in 1977 — within the confines of Italy, appropriately enough — garlic would get the funky instrumental it so richly deserves in the form of “Garlic Salt” by The Joy Unlimited Group & the Continentals:

“Garlic Salt”     The Joy Unlimited Group & the Continentals     1977

1978 would see the final album – Spaceguerilla – from German progressive jazz-rock group, Missus Beastly, with “King Garlic,” fittingly, as its closing track.

“King Garlic” by Missus Beastly — Side 2, track 4

Garlic LP-fBefore decade’s end, Leo Kottke would do his part to advance the cause with the release of 1979’s Balance, an LP that would include “1/2 Acre of Garlic.”

“1/2 Acre of Garlic” by Leo Kottke —  Yugoslavian PressingLeo Kottke LP-a

1979 would also see the release of a Folkways album – Folk Songs from Latin America by Suni Paz – that would include the heartfelt paean “Al Ajo (To Garlic)”:

“Al Ajo (To Garlic)” — side 1, track 4

Garlic LP-e1979 would prove to be a banner year, with the release of the soundtrack to George A. Romero’s vampire-themed film, Martin — an album that would include “Garlic Chase #6.”

“Garlic Chase #6 — side 1, track 7Garlic LP-a

But the big breakthrough for garlic in song would come by way of Chapel Hill foursome, Superchunk, who no doubt “sweated out” vast amounts of garlic recording their unabashed 1990 declaration of bulb love, “Garlic” — the B-side of a split single on noted indie label, Merge, along with Seaweed and Geek (“released to go with a US tour of the three bands”):

“Garlic”     Superchunk     1990

By the turn of the new century, it was a whole new era for Garlic in Popular Music, and even LeeScratchPerry and Guided By Voices would eventually get in on the game, as you will note on the list below — a public service from the tireless research staff at Zero to 180.

Garlic in Modern Pop:  An Exhaustive & Exhausting Discography

Also Worth a(n) Historical Asterisk

Bobby Gregory‘s Country Comedy LP includes a comic routine “We Always Feed Our Baby Garlic” that is also illustrated at the very bottom of the album cover – dead center:

Garlic LP-d

The “contents” of Side A from Monty Python‘s Previous Record from 1970 – written from the perspective of a ‘Harley St. dentist’ – is an amusing bit that includes a ‘Where’s Waldo’ game:  can you find the phrase “stinking garlic”?

Garlic LP-c

Early 90s Ohio Valley EDM

In retrospect, I now realize that Ed Goldstein was the first musician I knew personally to  obtain formal permission to record another musical artist’s work.  This was in 1992 — before the Internet would so much more readily facilitate this kind of information sleuthing — and I remember being somewhat impressed, and a little envious, that Ed and his musical partner, Scott Fuqua, were able to navigate this aspect of the music business.

Scott + Ed = Fuquay

Fuquay-xGoldstein and Fuqua joined together in the early 1990s to form Fuquay, Ohio Valley practitioners of EDM – “electronic dance music” – a full two decades or more before this musical genre (and I never saw this coming) would enter the pop mainstream.

cover art by Lynn Punkari

Fuquay Psychosis1992’s Psychosis would find the duo crafting 11 original instrumental compositions — and one inspired cover:  Oliver Nelson‘s theme to the 1970s TV action series, The Six Million Dollar Man:

[Pssst:  Click on triangle above to play “Six Million Dollars” by Fuquay]

I think it’s safe to say that Scott and Ed were the first “pop modernists” to breathe new life into Nelson’s composition following its mid-70s heyday.  Nelson, a respected jazz composer, bandleader, arranger and saxophonist, would be best remembered for The Blues and the Abstract Truth, his 1961 album with Freddie Hubbard, Eric Dolphy, Bill Evans, Paul Chambers, and Roy Haynes, .

Fuquay – like Peter Gabriel’s bagpipist, Larry Fast – would fully embrace the digital realm, as noted in the album credits:

“Scott Fuquay uses Emu-Systems, Korg, Ensoniq, Kawai, Tascam, Technics, SR&D, Charvel and Alesis equipment.

Eddie Goldstein uses Drum-Kat, Alesis, Dauz, Akai, and Vic Firth sticks.  All drum and percussion tracks played digitally, live, in real time.”

Zero to 180’s one and only encounter with a Vic Firth truck

Vic Firth truck-x

Zero to 180 is stunned to discover (thanks to Bionic: The Wiki) that Dusty Springfield sang the original theme song, which was used for the second Six Million Dollar Man “telefilm” Wine, Women & War but then replaced by Nelson’s instrumental version once the weekly series began.

one-time percussionist for LES NESSMAN & THE FINNYTOWN BRASS

Ed Goldstein-cc

We will all miss your joyful spirit, Ed.

Ed Goldstein-aaEd Goldstein-bb

“Washita Love Child”: Jesse Ed & Eric Whatsisname

In The World of Indigenous America, Brian Wright-McLeod writes of the “powwow style” and its influence in popular music, as exemplified by such artists as Jim Pepper, Peter DePoe, and Jesse Ed Davis:

“Jesse Ed Davis (Comanche-Kiowa) began his work as a leading session guitarist in the early 1960s when he accompanied country singer Conway Twitty.  The powwow influences in Davis’s music are both subtle and yet apparent to the trained ear.  From his first solo album, Jesse Davis (Atco, 1970), the song ‘Washita Love Child’ contains both lyrical references (‘And I did that powwow thing’) and the combined background vocals of Merry Clayton, Clydie King, and Gram Parsons, utilizing the vocal refrain of ‘hey-ya-hey’ typical of the powwow song style, but arranged by Davis as a standard back-up vocal.  The back beat and rhythm of the song are obviously powwow-based.”

Edited by ROBERT WARRIOR

World of Indigenous AmericaThe autobiographical “Washita Love Child” – with its driving beat and guest guitar solo by Eric Clapton – seems the obvious choice for the album’s opening track, and yet it would get bumped to the #3 spot:

“Washita Love Child”     Jesse Ed Davis with Eric Clapton     1970

Musician credits for Jesse Davis

  • Guitar, Keyboards & Vocals:  Jesse Edwin Davis III
  • Guitar:  Eric Clapton & Joel Scott Hill
  • Backing Vocals:  Bobby Jones, Clydie King, Gloria Jones, Gram Parsons, Maxine Willard, Merry Clayton, Nikki Barclay & Vanetta Fields
  • Keyboards:  Ben Sidran, John Simon, Larry Knechtel & Leon Russell
  • Bass:  Billy Rich & Steve Thompson
  • Drums:  Alan White, Bruce Rowland, Chuck Blackwell & Steve Mitchell
  • Percussion:  Alan Yoshida, Jackie Lomax, Johnnie Ware, Pat Daley, Pete Waddington & Sandy Konikoff
  • Tenor Saxophone:  Frank Mayes
  • Tenor Saxophone:  Jerry Jumonville [solo]
  • Trombone & Trumpet:  Darrell Leonard
  • Baritone Saxophone & Clarinet:  James Gordon
  • Producer, Arranger & Album Cover Concept:  Jesse Edwin Davis III
  • Cover Painting:  Jesse Edwin Davis II

Jesse Ed Davis 45-aJesse Ed Trivia That Might Blow Your MInd, If Slightly

~ Jesse Ed Davis released “Sue Me Sue You Blues” in 1972 before the song’s author, George Harrison, issued his own version on 1973’s Living in the Material World.

~ Jesse Ed Davis provided musical support for two artists who would each record distinctive versions of Dylan’s “A Hard Rain’s A-Gonna Fall” for debut albums released in 1971 & 1973, respectively:  Leon Russell (guitar) and Bryan Ferry (backing vocals).

~ In 1973, when Jesse Ed Davis and Iggy & the Stooges shared the same label for exactly one album, Columbia released a “split EP” (4 songs on a 7-inch 33 rpm record) that paired the two artists, bizarrely, for the first and last time.

Jesse Ed & Iggy-aJesse Ed & Iggy-b

~ In 1987, the year before his untimely death, Jesse Ed Davis contributed a guitar solo on the closing track “At Last” for Scott Colby‘s Slide of Hand album on respected punk label, SST (Black Flag, Minutemen, Descendents, Bad Brains, Hüsker Dü & Meat Puppets, et al.)


Jesse Ed Helped Breathe Life into the Following Songs:

~ “Doctor My Eyes” — the breakout hit from Jackson Browne’s 1972 debut album.

~ “Heal Your Heart” on Stevie Miller Band’s 1972 album, Recall the Beginning…A Journey from Eden.

~ “Open Up the Watergate (And Let the Sunshine In)” on 1974 Bert Jansch album, L.A. Turnaround.

~ “(What a) Wonderful World” from David Bromberg’s Midnight on the Water album from 1975.

~ “Stand By Me” (slide guitar solo) on John Lennon’s hit version from 1975’s Rock ‘n’ Roll album.

~ “Don’t Think … Feel” from 1976 Neil Diamond album, Beautiful Noise.

~ “Hard Workin’ Man” by Captain Beefheart with Jack Nitzsche & Friends from 1978 soundtrack album, Blue Collar.


Jesse Ed Played Guitar (et al.) on the Following Albums

  • Taj Mahal     Taj Mahal     1968
  • Taj Mahal     The Natch'l Blues     1968
  • Rolling Stones & Friends     Rock & Roll Circus     1968  [Taj Mahal]
  • Taj Mahal     Giant Steps     1969
  • Jesse [Ed] Davis     Jesse Davis     1970
  • George Harrison & Friends     Concert for Bangladesh     1971
  • Gene Clark     White Light     1971
  • Roger Tillison     Roger Tillison's Album     1971
  • Buffy Sainte-Marie     She Used to Wanna Be a Ballerina     1971
  • John Lee Hooker     Endless Boogie    1971
  • B.B. King     L.A. Midnight     1971
  • Albert King     Lovejoy     1971
  • Albert Collins     There's Gotta Be a Change     1971
  • Lightnin' Hopkins     It's a Sin to Be Rich     1972
  • Jesse Ed Davis     Ululu     1972
  • Alex Richman     Salty     1972
  • Jim Pulte     Out the Window     1972
  • Jesse Ed Davis     Keep Me Comin'     1973
  • Rod Taylor     Rod Taylor     1973
  • Dion     Born to Be With You     1975
  • Mac Davis     Burnin' Thing     1975
  • Harry Nilsson     ... That's the Way It Is  +  Sandman     1976
  • David Blue     Cupid's Arrow     1976
  • Jimmy Cliff     Follow My Mind     1976
  • Leonard Cohen     Death of a Ladies' Man     1977
  • Ben Sidran     A Little Kiss in the Night     1978
  • Jack Nitzsche & Friends     Soundtrack from 'Blue Collar'     1978

“Silver Springs” Maryland: Musically Unincorporated

I was recently reminded that Stevie Nicks wrote a song in 1976 that was intended for Fleetwood Mac‘s multi-platinum (i.e., 40+ million) Rumours album but, in the end, used only as a B-side.  This song, interestingly enough, is named for the place where my children were born and educated — Silver Spring, Maryland — a small “city” that, unfortunately, is unincorporated and thus impossible to define.

Silver Spring Maryland USA

It is unclear, for instance, whether Silver Spring includes the nearby communities of Lyttonsville, Forest Glen, Wheaton, Kemp Mill and White Oak — all unincorporated areas, like much of Montgomery County itself.

Silver Spring mapHilariously, Nicks misremembered the name in the plural – “Silver Springs” – not singular, a not uncommon occurrence and easy way to spot folks who are from “out of town.”

It’s not easy being Silver Spring:  EXHIBIT A

Silver Springs MDHowever, the decision to exclude “Silver Springs” from the album’s final running order was no laughing matter and would serve – I now know – as a source of tension that would help drive a wedge between Nicks and the rest of the band.  Ironically, notes Joe Benton in his “September 6th” Stevie Nicks interview, “Silver Springs” would be the comeback single twenty years later for Fleetwood Mac’s live reunion album, The Dance:

Besides ‘Sara,’ there’s another song that’s very special to Stevie Nicks.  It’s called ‘Silver Springs,’ and it was supposed to appear on the Rumours album, but without her knowledge, at the last minute it was pulled and relegated to a B-side, only to emerge twenty years later as the song that launched the band’s reunion.”

Silver Springs-aSilver Springs-bSilver Springs-cSilver Springs-e

As Nicks would explain “in her own words“:

“I wrote Silver Springs uh, about Lindsey [Buckingham].  And I ~ we were in Maryland somewhere driving under a freeway sign that said Silver Spring, Maryland.  And I loved the name. …Silver Springs sounded like a pretty fabulous place to me.  And uh, ‘You could be my silver springs…’ that’s just a whole symbolic thing of what you could have been to me.”
~Stevie Nicks, Classic Albums: Rumours, video 1998

Silver Spring-495 sign“I wrote it for Rumours, and fourteen years ago I walked into the studio and the record was basically done.  It was at the Record Plant, and Mick said, ‘Stevie, I need you to come outside to the parking lot cause I need to talk to you for a minute.’  And I knew it was really serious ’cause Mick never asks you to go out to the parking lot for anything.

So we walked to the huge Record Plant parking lot and he said, ‘I’m taking “Silver Springs” off the record.’  And, of course, my first reaction was, ‘Why?’  And he said, ‘There’s a lot of reasons, but because basically it’s just too long.  And we think that there’s another of your songs that’s better, so that’s what we want to do.’  Before I started to get upset about ‘Silver Springs,’ I said, ‘What other song?’  And he said, ‘A song called ‘I Don’t Want To Know.’  And I said, ‘But I don’t want that song on this record.’  And he said, ‘Well, then don’t sing it.’

And then I started to scream bloody murder and probably said every horribly mean thing that you could possibly say to another human being, and walked back in the studio completely flipped out.  I said, ‘Well, I’m not gonna sing ‘I Don’t Want To Know.’  I am one-fifth of this band.’  And they said. ‘Well, if you don’t like it, you can either (a) take a hike or (b) you better go out there and sing ‘I Don’t Want To Know’ or you’re only gonna have two songs on the record.’  And so, basically, with a gun to my head, I went out and sang ‘I Don’t Want To Know.’  And they put ‘Silver Springs’ on the back of ‘Go Your Own Way.'”
~Stevie Nicks, BBC radio interview, 1991

“Silver Springs” (MD)    Fleetwood Mac     1976

8th piece tagged as Musical Misspellings

Silver Springs-zz

“Yancey Special”: Prog Reggae II

Keith Emerson would captivate me as a grade schooler with the deep, heavy Moog sounds he conjured for “Lucky Man” — the final track, fittingly, on a 4-LP box set from 1973 that got a lot of mileage in our household growing up, Superstars of the Seventies, one of the earliest titles in the Warner Special Products series.

Superstars of the 70s-a“Lucky Man,” from Emerson, Lake & Palmer‘s 1970 debut album, derives much of its appeal from being a “power ballad” that builds to an explosive solo, and yet Aerosmith would get all the credit for having created this new rock subgenre, even though “Dream On” did not hit the record racks until 1973.

Dig the ’70s earth tones, man

Superstars of the 70s-xAfter Emerson, Lake and Palmer went their separate ways in 1979, Emerson would arrange a reggae-tinged take on a Meade Lux Lewis boogie instrumental, “Yancey Special” for his 1981 solo album Honky:

“Yancey Special”     Keith Emerson     1981

Most fascinatingly, Emerson’s first solo album post-ELP global fame would be released on an independent Italian label, Bubble, aimed at the “Italo-Disco” progressive dance market. Honky would find release two years later in the UK on Emerson’s imprint, Chord RecordsRock and Roll Paradise asserts Italy to be the only country where Honky was a hit album.

Keith Emerson - bubble This review in Vintage Rock would note —

“Emerson, on an extended vacation in the Bahamas, rounded up a crew of local musicians and exploded with a wild variation of calypso and reggae tunes—foreign substances to the legions of ELP fanatics who were expecting something less whimsical and more monumental.  But really — you can’t blame him for turning his back on the “legendary” noose around his neck and indulging seafaring gems like ‘Hello Sailor’ and ‘Rum-A-Ting.’  And the irresistible boogie woogie of Meade Anderson ‘Lux’ Lewis’ ‘Yancey Special’ shakes the manacles off completely”

Keith Emerson LPAccording to the liner notes, “honky” was a nickname used by children of the island and, thus, appropriated by Emerson for the album’s title.  “Yancey Special” would hit the airwaves two years after Rick Wakeman‘s cod reggae version of “Swan Lake,” the featured instrumental in Zero to 180’s January, 2015 piece, “Prog Rock Reggae.”

Keith Emerson:  One of The Best (Literally)

BB Chronicles offers a 1990 soundboard recording of a little-known (and short-lived) supergroup named The Best that once included Keith Emerson, along with John Entwistle (The Who), Joe Walsh (James Gang/Eagles), Jeff ‘Skunk’ Baxter (Doobie Brothers), and Simon Phillips (er, Toto).

           Keith Emerson & the skunk                        Emerson & the ox & the skunk

Keith Emerson & the skunk-xKeith Emerson & the ox & the skunk-x

Emerson’s spirit, sadly, would leave us this past March. – his obituary from the March 13, 2016 edition of The Guardian.

Ali: “The People’s Choice”

Muhammad Ali enjoyed such worldwide popularity, I’m surprised The Champ didn’t release more recordings over the course of his career, aside from two albums, a handful of singles, and, of course, the Ali and His Gang vs. Mr. Tooth Decay LPs:

Ali LP-a1Ali LP-aa1

Ali would launch his national campaign for dental health with a boxing match against the “pride of Cavityville” – Mr. Tooth Decay – on the grounds of the Washington Monument, as reported in the November 4, 1979 edition of the Washington Post:

“Yesterday’s match was sponsored free of charge, by A&P supermarkets, which will be distributing an album on tooth decay called May the Brush Be With You.  It features the voices of Ali, Frank Sinatra, Billie Jean King, Lily Tomlin and President Carter.  Most of the proceeds will go to charity — and the rest to Ali.”

Ali LP-b1Ali’s second full-length release (one of Billboard’s “recommended” soul albums in its  October 30, 1976 edition) would coincide with the nation’s bicentennial, hence the subtitle of the title track, “Ali’s Bicentennial Freedom Song.”

Ali LP-c1Ali LP-cc1

Zero to 180 is hoping someone can identify Muhammad Ali’s partner (i.e., “The Best Ever”) on this 1975 Polydor single A-side “The People’s Choice” that might possibly have been – oddly enough – for the European market only:

Ali 45-c1Click on triangle below to hear “The People’s Choice”

“The People’s Choice”     The Best Ever and Muhammad Ali     1975

Germany’s Trikont label would gather many rare and hard-to-find Ali-related songs in 2003 in a CD entitled Hits and Misses:  Muhammad Ali and the Ultimate Sound of Fistfighting:

  1. Muhammad Ali”     Tom Russell     [2003]
  2. 8ième Round”     Trio Madjesi     [1976?]
  3. Cassius Marcellus Clay”     Jorge Ben     [1971]
  4. The Ballad Of Cassius Clay”     The Alcoves     [1964]
  5. Muhammad Ali”     Sir Mack Rice     [1976]
  6. Foreman Ali Welcome To Kinshasa”     G.O. Malebo Orch.    [1974]
  7. The People’s Choice”     The Best Ever & Muhammad Ali     [1975]
  8. “You’re The Greatest”     Bette McLaurin     [1964]
  9. Muhammad Ali”     Dennis Alcapone     [1975]
  10. He Is He”     Page Scherer     [?]
  11. The Louisville Lip”     Eddie Curtis     [1971]
  12. Rumble In The Jungle”     Don Covay     [1974]
  13. Muhammad Ali”     Liberated Brother     [1975]
  14. Cassius Clay”     Dennis Alcapone     [1973]
  15. Foreman vs Frazier”     Big Youth     [1973]
  16. Muhammad Ali”     Mr. Calypson     [1971]
  17. Muhammad Ali”     Verne Harrell     [1971]
  18. Ali Shuffle”    J.W. Grasshopper & the Butterfly     [1974]
  19. Try It Again”     Joe Frazier     [1974]
  20. I’m The Greatest”     Muhammad Ali     [1976]
  21. Bommaye”     Pupi Y Su Charanga     [1975]

Ali 45-a1Ali 45-aaa1Ali 45-aa1Ali 45-b1Ali 45-e1Ali 45-d1Ali 45-f1Ali 45-h1Ali & the Beatles-1

Behind the Mic:  A Cassius Clay / Muhammad Ali Discography

Extra Rounds with The Champ!

“Doin’ the Ali Shuffle”     Alvin Cash     1967

“linger on (Cassius clay)”     Prince buster     1965

“Ali Bom-Ba-Ye”     Michael Masser & Mandrill     1977

Honorable Mention

Skeeter Davis     “I’m a Lover Not a Fighter”     1969

“I’m a lover not a fighter, I kinda like it that way.
If you want a a fighting partner, go live with Cassius Clay.”

Ali LP-xClancy Eccles 45 from 1964 “I’m the Greatest” sells for three figures

Ali 45-z

Van Morrison’s 1969 Pop Reggae

All these years I’ve naively assumed “I Shall Sing” to be a Judy Mowatt early reggae original (and 1974 Jamaican chart-topper, according to this Los Angeles Times piece from 1986).  And yet that same Times piece makes clear, Judy Mowatt was taking her musical inspiration from Miriam Makeba (not Art Garfunkel), as “I Shall Sing” turns out to have come from the pen of Van Morrison, who first recorded it November 11, 1969 for his Moondance album – but ultimately binned it!

Van Morrison sheet musicOn October 8, 2013, Mojo would make a rather big to-do over the premeire of this Caribbean-flavoured “never-before-released” track:

“I Shall Sing” (take 7)     Van Morrison     1969

Miriam Makeba’s Warner Brothers single was originally selected by Billboard for its Top 60 Pop Spotlight (i.e., predicted to reach the Top 60 of the Hot 100 Chart) in its July 4, 1970 edition:

“This happy Van Morrison swinger serves as potent material for the top stylist.  Her most commercial outing in some time this could prove an out and out smash.”

Van Morrison - Miriam Makeba 45-aArt Garfunkel would have the most success with “I Shall Sing” in the States (#38 Pop) in 1973 — Billboard would select Garfunkel’s 45 as one of the “Top Single Picks” for the week of December 15, 1973 and have these words of praise:

“A zesty tune from Art’s current album brings us a happy picture with a Caribbean flavor.  This is hand clapping, joyous music with Garfunkel’s dueting with himself and lots of infectious music behind his saga of always singing as a way of staying happy.”

Van Morrison - Art Garfunkel 45-aIn 1971, Jean and the Gaytones would release a “strings reggae” version in both Jamaica & the UK (produced by Sonia Pottinger – with “Musical Fight” on the flip!), while France Gall would give the song the Schlager treatment that same year for the German market.

Toots and the Maytals, meanwhile, would arrange a stellar roots reggae version for 1976’s Reggae Got Soul album, while Marcia Griffiths would revive “I Shall Sing” in 1993 in a modern roots style.

Van Morrison - Judy Mowatt 45-a

“Hipster”: That You, Mr. Brinson?

I’m surprised there aren’t more web pages that pay tribute to Julius Brinson, gym teacher extraordinaire, whose boundless energy and relentless good cheer have brightened countless days for the students, parents, and fellow staff of Sligo Creek Elementary School.

It’s no secret that Mr. Brinson is rather adept at mixing a sound board, as his DJ skills are regularly put to use at school events.  How likely is that before he embarked on a long and distinguished career as a physical education instructor, Julius Brinson had taken a run at the big time in the early 1970s with this coveted dance track on obscure indie, Interstate 95?

“Hipster”     C. Forture & J. Brinson     1971?

Years later “Hipster” would easily command three-digit figures at auction.  Fortunately, German label Tramp Records would take pity on the rest of us in 2012 and include “Hipster” in its funk and soul compilation Movements 4.

Brinson 45Mr. Brinson will be in full effect at today’s big annual event at Sligo Creek Elementary:  The Salamander Stride — a “fun run” for the entire student body and a fundraiser for the PTA, in addition to being a fun time for the whole school community.

Zero to 180 readers may direct their generosity to the Salamander Stride fundraising pages for Nick Richardson and Vivian Richardson.

jO rASI – Aug/Sep 2014 edition of ‘Our Children’ – National PTA Magazine

Salamander Stride