Scotty Moore: Producer

I am struck by the number of Scotty Mooreproduced 45s from the late 60s/early 70s that are not available for preview on YouTube due to their relative obscurity — most especially the rare Otis Redding tribute “We’re Gonna Miss You, Otis” b/w “Macon,” whose B-side was actually written by Moore, whose spirit left us four weeks ago today.

Fortunately, that’s not the case for a memorable garage rock 45 from 1966 on tiny little label, Down Home, that bears production credits by Scotty Moore, along with session keyboardist, songwriter, publisher and producer Jerry Smith (who played piano on Dick Curless’ 1973 Live at the Wheeling Truck Driver’s Jamboree album).  Check out the heavy rockabilly guitar break in the middle of “Ain’t About to Lose My Cool” by The Original Dukes:

“Ain’t About to Lose My Cool”     The Original Dukes     1966

Charles Best:  Organ & vocals
James Hickman:  Guitar
James Sonday:  Drums
Richard Martin:  Bass, Sax & Harmonica

Not much seems to be known about The Original Dukes, other than they hailed from Indianapolis.  Prepare to fork over a little dough should you decide to own an original copy of this 45.

Note the (unintended?) wordplay of the song’s authorship — “Sonday/Best.”

Original Dukes 45

“Ain’t About to Lose My Cool” would make the lineup for Volume 3 of the Greg Shaw-curated Pebbles series of indie garage 45s taken from his own collection of over one million records.

Purple Reign – from 1968!

One has to wonder whether the Columbus, Ohio combo – Purple Reign – sought legal counsel over the homophonic similarity of the band’s name with the title of Prince’s career-defining album (22 million sales worldwide to date) and movie from 1984, Purple Rain:

“Wish You Didn’t Have to Go”     Purple Reign     1968

Note the singer’s ingenious use of “home-spun” echo on the song’s chorus — who needs expensive gadgetry and special effects when you can be your own Echoplex?

How fun to see (as a former Ohio State student who frequented record shops) that Used Kids Records (a subsidiary of Columbus-based School Kids Records) sold this 45 a couple years ago for sixteen bucks.  As Buckeye Beat notes, this 7-inch recording is a “split” single, which means a different artist on the flip side — in this case, Touches of Gold.

Check out Hillside‘s built-in ad on the 45 label itself:  “For Rent Guitars – Amps – Microphones – Organ – Piano – Speakers – P.A. Systems”:

Purple Reign 45

The Muffetts: Former Mojos

Thanks to “tymeshifter” at rateyourmusic for providing the back story on a single issued by Counterpart whose A & B sides were purchased (I’m shocked) by Laurie Records in 1968:

1966 single by Hurricane WV’s the Mojos, who begat The Muffetts

Mojos 45“These guys were previously known as The Mojos from West Virginia.  Their manager talked them into relocating to Columbus, OH in order to fulfill contractual obligations for a band called The Muphets, who had just disbanded.  They immediately renamed themselves The Muffetts for that purpose.  This first single was originally released on Counterpart, but picked up by Laurie a few months later.  And it’s a killer!.  Side A is mid-tempo garage/pop with fuzz weaving throughout, vocal harmony and fairly loud drumming.  The other side is mid-slow, garage influenced psych with vocal harmony, acoustic guitar and a reverbed fuzz-wah break.”

“Lost”     The Muffetts     1968

I love the acoustic guitars that precede the vintage 1968 fuzztone electric lead guitar and “Moody Blues” harmonies that follow each verse – so much so, in fact, that I’m even willing to look the other way when they nick the bridge to “Incense and Peppermints” for their own!.

It would appear that B-side “Heather Girl” made Columbus, OH’s WCOL AM’s Top 40 hit list for two weeks in Summer, 1968.

Muffetts 45-aMuffetts 45-b

The Muffetts would release one more (rare) single on NYC’s Chelsea Ltd. label in 1969 – “Dance, Dance, Dance” b/w “Make It Alright.”

“A Shad Day Production” — could Shad O’Shea be involved?

Muffetts 45-cHeavens to Murgatroyd!  Story #11 in Zero to 180’s Counterpart Records History Series

Psych + Horns = The Gears

Doc Lehman’s Bangagong! music blog has a poster for a “Festival of Bands” in Columbus, Ohio that took place in 1967 — 34 bands over the course of 2 evenings, admission just $1:

Is this the same Vox as in Vox Guitar-Organ and Vox Phantom guitars?

Vox Festival of Bands 1967Interesting to note that the first band at the top of each list would record a memorable 45 for Counterpart Records, either that same year – The Fifth Order’s “A Thousand Devils” – or the next one – The Gears, with their horns-heavy psychedelic classic, “Come Back to Me“:

“Come Back to Me”     The Gears     1968

The Gears would record one more 45 that same year – “Feel Right” – for Columbus label, Hillside, and then … nothing more?

Gears 45-aGears 45-b

Jubilation!  This is story #10 in Zero to 180’s Counterpart Records History Series.

Band Name That Inspired U2?

According to Buckeye Beat, Shad O’Shea was instrumental in fashioning a local hit out of “The Only Thing to Do” by Cincinnati’s own The “Us Too” Group:

“Somehow the record got the attention of Counterpart Records Shad O’Shea (a.k.a. Howard Lovdal) who took an interest in ‘The Only Thing To Do.’  Shad decided to release an edited version of the song, backed with a different flip side called ‘The Way it Must Be,’ an excellent slow number which was recorded at the same time as the two sides of the [earlier] Jinx 45.  Although it’s not clear why Shad made the change, the guess would be that he wanted a fast and slow side to make clear which one to push.

The effectively edited ‘Only Thing To Do’ was released in February of ’67 and hit immediately on Cincinnati’s #1 station WSAI.  The record went to top 10 on WSAI and WUBE, the #2 station in town.  The record even earned a spin on Stan Matlock’s WKRC ‘easy listening’ drive time program, which happened to catch the ear of Len [Gartner]’s thrilled father – apparently Matlock had no idea he was spinnin’ a platter by a local teen rock band.”

“The Only Thing to Do”     The ‘Us Too’ Group     1967

Text that accompanies the above YouTube audio clip:

“This record comes out of Cincinnati, Ohio.  The Us Too Group was comprised of members Joe Madrigal, Glen Davis, Bob Dickens, Tom Whisner and Len Gartner.  This record was cut at King records studios in late 1966 and the group had 100 copies pressed up on the Jinx record label.  By early 1967 the record had come to the attention of Counterpart records owner Shad O’Shea who edited this song from the longer version cut for Jinx and issued it with a new B side that was cut at the same sessions that yielded the A side.  The record became an immediate local hit, making the top 10 on some of the top Cincinnati radio stations, WUBE and WSAI.  They had one more record issued as Us Too on [Willie Mitchell’s] Hi record label plus another issued as Maelstrom and broke up after one final Us Too 45 on Counterpart in 1968, after numerous changes in group members.  The various members of the group continued performing with other musicians through the years.  This is one of my all time favorite 45’s and I hope you dig it!”

Us Too 45

Buckeye Beat also reports that Hi Records purchased Us Too’s follow-up 45 “I’ll Leave You Crying” on the spot when it was played over the phone line by WSAI DJ, Tom Dooley.  Someone would pay $73 in 2009 for Us Too’s lone 45 on the Hi label.

Wake the nation!  This is story #9 in Zero to 180’s Counterpart Records History Series

Another 45 Sold to Laurie

Things were starting to really heat up for Counterpart Records in 1967.  “See What’s Right” by The Wyngates was followed by (1) a regional hit, “Hey Conductor” by Mark V (featuring Sonny Flaharty), that got picked up by Philips for national distribution and then (2) another promising 45 – “A Thousand Devils” by Columbus, Ohio’s Fifth Order – that was snatched up so quickly by Laurie Records that no one seems to own a copy of the original Counterpart record:

“A Thousand Devils (Are Chasin’ Me)”     The Fifth Order     1967

Billboard would note the sale in its September 9, 1967 edition:

“Laurie Records has bought the master for the Counterpart record ‘A Thousand Devils’ by the Fifth Order.”

Two weeks later, Billboard would pick this 45 to reach the “Hot 100” chart.   Interesting to point out that Counterpart’s owner, Shad O’Shea would be listed as one of the song’s co-creators (using his birth name, Howard Lovdal).

The Buick-inspired Electras would evolve into The Fifth Order

Fifth Order-ElectrasColumbus Music History’s piece about the resurgence of interest in Fifth Order reveals that (1) “A Thousand Devils” was #1 on the hit list of 1230 AM WCOL the week of September 11, 1967 and (2) Counterpart Records released a third and “virtually unknown 45 of earlier recordings” in 1968 after the group had already disbanded!

         1st Counterpart 45           B-side of “controversial” third 45

Fifth Order 45-aFifth Order 45-b

Shad O’Shea, however, would have another opportunity to make a deal with Laurie Records in 1968 for Soul Inc’s “Love Me When I’m Down,” as noted earlier in our series.

photo courtesy of expo-67’s Opulent conceptions

Fifth Order

Opulent Confession tells us that debut Counterpart 45 “Goin’ Too Far” is a garage rock classic that sold, according to the liner notes of the band’s 2004 CD retrospective, sold upwards of 18,000 records — prompting indie label Diamond to purchase the song for national distribution

A-Side Turned B-Side?

Louisville’s Soul Inc. is another music group from my hometown’s Ohio Valley region that recorded a local hit (“Love Me When I’m Down”) on a local label (Counterpart) that had been recorded locally (at Louisville’s Falls City perhaps?) and played on local AM hits radio station WSAI (thus, giving further credence to Nick Clooney’s recent statement that Cincinnati was a uniquely endowed media market that rivaled/bettered Chicago, New York, and Los Angeles):

“Love Me When I’m Down”     Soul Inc.     1968

“Love Me When I’m Down” is the A-side of a 1968 ‘rock ‘n’ soul’ Counterpart single that directly led to the band’s signing with the respected independent label, Laurie — only to have the A & B sides reversed on their debut Laurie 45!

A-Side                                                            B-Side

Soul Inc - Counterpart 45Soul Inc - Laurie 45

As Soul Inc. explains on its own website:

The band’s in-your-face quality was evident on Love Me When I’m Down,’ released as their next single along with ‘I Belong to Nobody.’  More than anything else the group recorded, Love Me When I’m Down’ captures Soul, Inc.’s live sound, with Young and Bugbee’s driving guitars (the solo is by Bugbee), Settle’s aggressive vocal, and Maxwell’s pounding drums.  We always said that we wanted the drums to sound like a bag of rocks,’ Maxwell recalls.”

Interesting to note that, as with The New Lime, (a) Soul Inc’s first 45 would also be issued on Cincinnati’s Fraternity label and (2) Shad O’Shea’s Counterpart Records would likewise help pave the path toward the band’s getting signed to a more nationally prominent label.

In a 2011 auction, an original Counterpart 45 sold for $45, while at this very moment, someone on Ebay is hoping to sell a copy for a whopping $100!

*Previous Zero to 180 piece about Laurie ‘rock ‘n’ soul’ 45 from 1966 — Ernie Maresca‘s “The Good Life.”

Cincinnati’s Big 3 Indie (Labels)

The mod organ and soulful vibraphone make a winning combination in 1967’s “Perfect Girl” by The New Lime from Campbell County, Kentucky:

“The Perfect Girl”     The New Lime     1967

[The organ+vibes immediately brings to mind seminal single “Space Walk” by The Astros!]

It is 2015, and I am only now aware – thanks to independent producer and music writer, Randy McNutt – that I have been unintentionally ignoring a third significant Cincinnati music production mill in addition to (1) King Records and (2) Fraternity:  (3) Counterpart!

Counterpart RecordsCounterpart Records is the brainchild of Shad O’Shea (Howard Lovdal, by birth).  According to McNutt, after CBS sold its Cincinnati’s radio affiliate, WCPO, O’Shea was no longer a radio show host, thus, O’Shea immediately shifted his career focus, first to creating a label – Counterpart – and second, to building a brick-and-mortar recording facility.  Says McNutt:

“[O’Shea’s] Counterpart Records label, when I was in high school was like a major to me.  His records were played on WSAI and other stations.  He broke many good rock-band records.  Then he’d sell them to larger indies or the majors.  He had a wall in hallway office at the studio with nothing but 45s that he produced or released over the years, including ones on Mercury, RCA, Columbia, Laurie, Monument, SSS International, and other labels.  There must have been 50 records on that big wall.  He recorded groups such as the New Lime, which went from Counterpart to Columbia under his guidance; the Mark V out of Dayton (‘Hey Conductor’), and other groups.

“Counterpart was regional, going into Kentucky and Indiana. But its big strength was in Cincinnati and Dayton.  Shad had a big hit if he sold 5,000 copies.  Sometimes he would get a hot regional record, and it would catch the eye of a major or a national independent.  They would lease the master from him.  This happened to him with the Mark V’s “Hey Conductor” in, I believe, 1967.  The group was from Dayton.  The record was then re-released on Mercury’s Phillips label.

“I started cutting records over at Counterpart and became a close friend of his.  He bought the Fraternity Records name from Harry Carlson in 1975.  I placed masters with both Harry and Shad over the years.  In fact, I might be the only indie producer to have the distinction (small as it is) of placing masters with all three owners of Fraternity.”

Shad O’Shea (and Webster)

Shad O'Shea The New Lime:   Singles Discography

Whenever I Look In Her Eyes/And She Cried --------- Fraternity F947   1965
It's Your Turn to Cry/Only You -------------------- Boss 9915         1966
Meant to Be/Walkin the Dog ------------------------ Counterpart 2495  196?
That Girl/She Kissed Me (With Her Eyes) ----------- Counterpart 2577  1967
That Girl/She Kissed Me (With Her Eyes) ----------- Columbia 4-44017  1967
There Goes My Girlfriend/Girl w Long Blonde Hair -- Counterpart 2593  1967
Meant to Be/Perfect Girl -------------------------- Counterpart 2599  196?
Ain't Got No Soul/I Still Remember ---------------- Counterpart 2609  1967
Donna/The Gumdrop Trilogy ------------------------- Counterpart 2626  196?
Donna/The Gumdrop Trilogy ------------------------- Columbia 4-44597  1968
Sunny/I Still Remember ---------------------------- Minart 150        196?

 Link to Buckeye Beat’s tribute page to The New Lime.

The Impacs: King Goes Garage Surf

King wasn’t the only independent label in the early rock era to dabble in various sounds and musical genres; nevertheless, it’s still pretty hard to beat King for its sheer stylistic breadth.  While never really considered much of a “rock” label, King nevertheless signed another Beatle-sounding group (besides Them) called The Impacs, who – judging by the Fender guitars on their two King album covers – look like they might also have a little west coast surf in their sound.

Impacs LP b1Impacs LP a1

The Impacs first recording session on December 10, 1963 yielded 28 songs, of which 12 (including “Cat Walk”; “The Grab”; “Hamburger”; “Ambush”; “Love Struck” & “The Breeze”) would remain unreleased.  One more round of recording on May 12-13, 1964 would yield 8 more songs, all of them seeing light of day as single and/or album tracks.  All recording was done “principally” in Miami.

An avid collector of 45s once described The Impacs as “surf rock” within the context of “pre 65 garage” music.  Of the five King 45s released, only one is available for preview, however, on YouTube – but it’s classic:

I suspect the B-side, “Cape Kennedy Fla,” and album track, “Music for a Space Station,” are both instrumentals, as I know “Kool It” and “Zot” both to be.

The Impacs King Discography

King 45 #5851 “Two Strangers” b/w “Jo-Ann” 1964

King 45 #5863 “Shimmy Shimmy” b/w “Zot” 1964

King 45 #5891 “Kool It” b/w “She Didn’t Even Say Hello” 1964

King 45 #5910 “Ain’t That the Way Life Is” b/w “Don’t Cry Baby” 1964

King 45 #5965 “Your Mama Put the Hurt on Me” b/w “Cape Kennedy Fla” 1964

King LP #886 Impact 1964

King LP #916 A Week-End with The Impacs 1964