Brian Jonestown: Anti-Google

Once upon a time, kids – this might be hard to believe – the world’s second most valuable brand had the following naive-and-somewhat-puerile corporate ethos:  “Don’t be evil.”   Honest.  This private firm then went public and promptly went back on its word in the course of doing business with more repressive regimes around the world and responding to shareholder pressure to maximize return on investment.  Tax Justice Blog reveals all:

“In 2012 alone, Google dodged an estimated $2 billion in income taxes by shifting an estimated $9.5 billion to offshore tax havens.”

Google, no doubt, has better uses for this money and is in no way planning to keep all the money for itself.  Most fascinatingly, when you Google (ironic?) the phrase “don’t be evil,” the search results show the Wikipedia summary blurb for “Don’t be evil” in the present tense (i.e., “…is the corporate motto”), but when you click on the Wikipedia entry itself, the statement suddenly becomes past tense:   was.

Too Late!  already evil

Google = Evil [Tax Justice Blog]

Fortunately, Anton Newcombe and The Brian Jonestown Massacre have never felt pressured by any do-gooder mandate — if anything, quite the opposite.  The guiding principle from the band’s inception has been clear and unfaltering:  “Keep music evil.”  Would you be surprised to learn that the Brian Jonestown Massacre has its own Super PAC – The Committee to Keep Music Evil?

        Evil, yes.                                               Shoegazers, too?

Keep Music Evil-aKeep Music Evil-b

Despite the overt Stones and Beatles references, Brian Jonestown Massacre represents a generational shift in modern rock where Velvet Underground-style drone – not blues (as noted in my earlier piece about DC-area modern rockers, Gist) – is the lingua franca for many of the up-and-coming beat groups here in the new century.  Anton and the boys would make explicit this musical approach in the title of their first long-player Methodrone, issued by the very visionary Greg Shaw (who left us much too early at the age of 55) on his Bomp! label.   Newcombe would write and engineer “That Girl Suicide” along with the fourteen other tracks on this album – although the comments below would strongly seem to suggest some inter-band grumbling:

“That Girl Suicide”     Brian Jonestown Massacre     1995

Anton himself would attach the following comments to the above YouTube clip :

“I picked out a matching guitar and bass for an ex-girlfriend Diana… matching because she wanted to learn. We were sitting in her bedroom, and I said play this “the bass riff” and I did the rest, then tricked the group bit by bit at the next practice. Everyone still thinks they wrote it. Whatever. Go listen to all their records of all the great songs they wrote and get back to me. I could actually care less. I’m too busy writing new songs.”

Oh, and one more thing:

“Let me add – the actual session is live at the compound with the group – one take… that’s why the vocals are not so hot… we were all in the main room… and everyone did a good job. Including Brian Glaze. Travis Thrillkel was good in these days with me on the psycho bits and Jeff was great at rhythm, we both had this country old school Chet Atkins thing in our blood that would pop up sometimes… with all the other junk.”

“That Girl Suicide” would never enjoy the experience of being singled out for 45 release, although the song, curiously enough, would be deemed important enough for inclusion on Caroline artist showcase, I Hear Ya!  Fall 1995 – Caroline Distribution CD Sampler #11.

 Not sure how I feel about this

Brian Jonestown Massacre-aLip Magazine identifies “That Girl Suicide” as one of “10 Brian Jonestown Songs You Need to Hear” and has this to say about it:

“An early track from their debut, Spacegirl and other Favorites, that revolves around a repetitive guitar riff and off-kilter vocals.  ‘That Girl Suicide’ showcases some of the band’s early shoegazing influences.  Featured in the movie DiG! and a long-time fan favourite.”

A huge tip of the hat to Joel Gion for demonstrating through deed that being “just” the tambourine player need not be the musical equivalent of being relegated to right field.  I remember coming away from a particularly inspired 9:30 Club performance convinced that Gion had just about stolen the show.  In 2014, Gion would tap into his own creative spirit by putting out his first solo effort, Apple Bonkers, with instrumental support from BJM members past and present – Matt Hollywood, Jeffrey Davies, Daniel Allaire, and Miranda Lee Richards – along with Pete Holmstrom of The Dandy Warhols, Ryan Van Kriedt (The Asteroid #4/Dead Skeletons) & JasonPluckyAnchondo (The Warlocks/Spindrift).

Of course, that was then – Anton’s music has evolved considerably, as one would expect.  The Guardian checked in with Newcombe, who relocated to Europe in 2007 and now lives in Berlin – link to this 2014 interview.  Wait – The Guardian checked back in a year later.

Brian Jonestown Massacre:  Then and/or Now
(image courtesy Lip Magazine)

Brian Jonestown Massacre-cWake up, DC!  The Brian Jonestown Massacre return to the 9:30 Club May 5th this year!

35 years of righteous food & quality sound (and low ticket fees)

930 Club-cakeZero to 180 is particularly obsessed with 2003 B-side (!) “Nailing Honey to the Bee”  — and, fancy that:  Julian Cope and I are equally fascinated with this limited-edition 7″ (although I am befuddled by Cope’s description of “Bee” as an “electronic instrumental”?).

Debt of gratitude to Bill Hanke, who is blessed with an uncanny set of musical antennae  and who first insisted that I check out Brian Jonestown Massacre when they played DC’s Black Cat in the late 1990s (Backstage, of course) with The Greenhornes as warm-up act.

Bill Hanke:  true sports rocker

Bill Hanke