True or False? Led Zep on K-Tel

True or False?  Led Zeppelin have appeared on a K-Tel album.

Answer:

True!

The band that famously refused to do TV appearances did not, generally speaking stoop to K-Tel‘s level of crass commercialism.  Led Zeppelin cultivated such a mystique amongst their fanbase, in fact, that it was thought the band didn’t deign to do singles — obviously untrue when you browse their 7-inch output on 45Cat (each and every Zep album was accompanied by a 45 release, don’t kid yourself).

And yet, unbelievably, Led Zeppelin once said yes to K-Tel:  1980’s The Summit, released by K-Tel UK & Ireland — an album that includes “Candy Store Rock” (from 1976’s Presence), fittingly as the final track:

“Candy Store     Rock”     Led Zeppelin     1976

Does the band get forgiveness points, since “proceeds from this album are contributed to The Year of the Child to help sick and handicapped children”?

K-Tel's The Summit-front-aaAs Herc’s K-Tel Albums explains —

“Hot on the heels of the Kampuchea concerts, K-Tel rush-released The Summit in January 1980, featuring a baker’s dozen of tracks from rock royalty, all of whom donated their proceeds to UNESCO’s The International Year Of The Child (1979). Kurt Waldheim, then secretary-general of the United Nations, was crucial in organizing both the Concerts for the People of Kampuchea and The International Year Of The Child projects.”

Zep on K-Tel cover!
<click on image for maximum resolution>

K-Tel's The Summit-rear-a

Nevertheless, we can’t let Zeppelin fully off the hook, given their powerlessness in preventing “Whole Lotta Love” — the 3-minute edited version, no less — from being used on a ‘Warner Special Product’ (namely, 1973 box set Superstars of the 70’s), thus giving their high-falutin reputation a slight blemish.  Note, too, the existence of an ‘alternateSuperstars of the Stars 4-album collection that includes “D’yer Maker” (instead of “Whole Lotta Love”), as well as Hendrix track “Freedom” (versus “Purple Haze” and “Foxey Lady”).

‘Alternative’ Superstars of the 70s 4-LP collection

Superstars of the 70s - alternate version

“D’yer Maker” and Hendrix’s “Freedom” would reunite for another Warner Special Product — 1974’s Heavy Metal 2-record set, with “24 electrifying performances.”

Could easily pass for a K-Tel cover, right?

K-Tel's Heavy Metal“Whole Lotta Love” would get trotted out again for 1976 Warner Special Product LP, Listen to the Music.

K-Tel's Listen to the Music

3 songs one could not escape in the 1970s:

K-Tel's Listen to the Music-rear cover1997 would prove historic, as Zeppelin permitted “Misty Mountain Hop” (of all things) to be the band’s special contribution to Time-Life’s Gold and Platinum, Vol. 2:  1971-1973, in collaboration with Warner Special Products.

Time-Life Gold & Platinum Vol 2In 2003, Jimmy Page would even make the CD cover, when “Misty Mountain Hop” made an encore appearance on Time-Life’s Do It Again from the ‘Legends’ series (with liner notes from Ben Fong-Torres), also in synergistic partnership with Warner Special Products.

Time-Life Legends - Do It Again11311 K-Tel Drive = Minnetonka, Minnesota:
The New “Hitsville USA”?

Thanks to family members strategically located in Minnetonka, Zero to 180 is grateful to have had the opportunity to visit 11311 K-Tel Drive, the corporate headquarters of K-Tel International since 1975, as any music scholar will tell you.

K-Tel’s former address in Mid-City (via 1974’s Today’s Super Greats)

K-Tel's Today's Super Greats11311 K-Tel Drive:  Leafier than 2648 W Grand Blvd (via 1975’s Sounds Spectacular)

K-Tel s Sounds Spectacular LP

K-Tel’s service in maintaining the commercial vitality of our great nation’s pop hits – long after their initial “expiration date” – has been widely mocked, which is sadly short-sighted, given the company’s honorable efforts in fighting Madison Avenue attitudes (i.e., old = bad) that have unmistakably infiltrated popular consciousness due to a relentless bombardment of advertising that fetishizes newness for the sake of newness.

K-Tel would celebrate 35 years of success in grand style with a supplemental 17-page advertisement in the March 8, 1997 edition of Billboard.(pages K-1 through K-17) that includes messages of congratulations from Sony Music Special Products, EMI-Capitol, Polygram, Curb Records, Select-O-Hits, local heroes The Trashmen, The Castaways, Steppenwolf’s John Kay, the Marshall Tucker Band, and Ernest Evans himself (a.k.a., Chubby Checker).  These 17 packed pages include a profile of founder Phillip Kives (K-Tel = Kives Television), who “starred in what may have been the first infomercial:  a five-minute spot in support of a non-stick frying pan,” plus a history of the music label (“Original Hits! Original Stars!  K-Tel’s Super Gold Music Machine Rolls Right On”) that states the company’s musical inventory to be “approximately 2,700 masters, dating from the ’50s up through the ’80s and beyond.”

K-Tel:  Your Green Light to Hits

K-Tel Drive - HQ

But mere months later, Don Jeffrey would report on a worrisome organizational restructuring of K-Tel International in Billboard‘s November 22, 1997 edition

Just months after terminating a deal that would have divested its music assets, K-Tel International has restructured the music company and set ambitious plans to become an online music retailer and a distributor of other labels’ recordings.

As part of the change, the company has tapped Mark Dixon, its top financial executive, as COO of the music unit, Ktel International (USA), which remains based in Minneapolis. The corporate offices, however, are moving to Los Angeles, where company president David Weiner will oversee the music unit, international operations, a direct-marketing subsidiary, a home video imprint, and a new Internet venture.  Weiner says the move will enable K-Tel to “tap into a larger talent pool.”

By mid-December, Weiner says the company will launch K-Tel Online and develop the site over the next year into a major Internet retailer to compete with CDnow, Music Boulevard, and World Wide Web sites operated by traditional music chains.  At the site www.ktel.com, consumers will also be able to order customized CDs made up of tracks from the company-owned catalogs.

Alas, Greg Beets would break the sad news — “Where were you when you found out K-Tel declared bankruptcy and shut down its U.S. music distribution subsidiary?” — in the May 4, 2001 edition of the Austin Chronicle.  Turning popular wisdom on its head, Beets points out that “although K-Tel’s buffet-style MO [modus operandi] seems quintessentially American,” the company was actually founded in Winnipeg, Ontario in 1962, before Kives moved operations to Minneapolis in the early Seventies.

Kives wasn’t the first (that would be Art Leboe’s Oldies but Goodies series), and he wasn’t without competition (Ronco and Adam VIII), but “it was K-Tel,” Beets observed, “that truly cultivated the form into a pop culture institution ripe for parody.”

K-Tel’s Krass Kommercialism:
A Tribute by Greg Beets

During the Seventies, K-Tel’s marketing ploys had the same seedy appeal as a carnival barker’s come-on.  The pitch was fast and furious, with deftly spliced snippets of music, song titles rapidly scrolling across the screen, and an overcaffeinated announcer imploring you to order now.  Some aficionados swear the ads said K-Tel albums were not available in stores, even though they were — at unhip outlets such as drug and discount stores.

You won’t find a much better snapshot of pop music in the early Seventies than 1972’s Believe in Music.  Named for Gallery’s “I Believe in Music,” the album kicks off with the 1-2-3 feel-good punch of “Brandy (You’re a Fine Girl)” by Looking Glass, “Beautiful Sunday” by Daniel Boone, and “Sunny Days” by Lighthouse. Throw in Donny Osmond, the O’Jays, and a few more weird obscurities like Mouth & MacNeil’s “How Do You Do?” and Bulldog’s “No,” and you have a bass-ackwardly definitive compilation rivaled only by Nuggets.

Maybe K-Tel butchered art for profit.  But even if that were true, does it make K-Tel any worse than a record company padding a marginal artist’s album with filler? Though it came at the expense of artistic vision, K-Tel’s Seventies output was nothing if not value-driven.  Where else could you get up to 25 hit songs for the low, low price of $5.98 ($7.98 for 8-track)?

That said, the sonic quality of vintage K-tel albums is truly awful.  You’ll find better low end on a distant AM radio station, and the flimsier-than-Dynaflex vinyl ensures quick scratches if you so much as breathe too hard on it.  And no discussion of K-Tel would be complete without mentioning the blinding colors and screaming fonts utilized in the subtle-as-a-meat-cleaver cover art.  But, as the tired old saying goes, that’s part of the charm.

Note:  Beets would also voice the widely-held notion that “respectable artists, such as the Beatles and the Rolling Stones, never showed up on K-Tel” — a view that, as Zero to 180’s recent research has revealed, does not withstand factual scrutiny.

Explosive Dynamic Super Smash Hits!

100 years or so ago, Minnetonka had served as the inspiration for Thurlow Lieurance‘s oft-covered [Paul Whiteman, Glenn Miller, Three Suns, Bud Isaacs, Billy Mure] composition, “By the Waters of the Minnetonka,” from 1914 (PDF of original sheet music courtesy of Greer Music Library — Digital Commons @ Connecticut College).

Marty Gold Orchestra — 1959

Minnetonka cover - Marty Gold Orchestra LP

Led Zep Resorts to Gimmickry

How could have I have lived through the Led Zeppelin era and not have known that their final studio release featured an inner sleeve that (like Donovan‘s Cosmic Wheels) began life as a monochromatic image but (unlike any album before or since) would magically burst with color when washed with water?!   My eternal gratitude to Ed Goldstein of Big Car Jack for bringing this serious issue to my attention.  But that’s not the whole story – Discogs.com has the info:

“[In Through the Out Door] featured an unusual gimmick:  the album had an outer sleeve which was made to look like a plain brown paper bag (reminiscent of similarly packaged bootleg album sleeves with the title rubber stamped on it), and the inner sleeve featured black and white line artwork which, if washed with water, would become permanently fully coloured.  There were also six different sleeves featuring a different pair of photos (one on each side), and the external brown paper sleeve meant that it was impossible for record buyers to tell which sleeve they were getting.  (There is actually a code on the spine of the album jacket which indicated which sleeve it was—this could sometimes be seen while the record was still sealed.)

The pictures all depicted the same scene in a bar (in which a man burns a Dear John letter), and each photo was taken from the separate point of view of someone who appeared in the other photos.  The bar is the Absinthe Bar [i.e., Jean Lafitte’s Old Absinthe House], located at [240] Bourbon Street in New Orleans, LA.  The walls are covered with thousands of yellowed business cards and dollar bills.  It was re-created in a London studio for the album sleeve design.”

“Magic Dot” inner sleeve – inspired by Jimmy Page’s daughter’s special coloring books

Led Zep 'magic' sleeveYou can view all six sleeve designs by clicking here — additional related images can also be found at music blog, Stitches and Grooves.  According to blogger, Codex99, In Through the Out Door, sadly, “marked not only the end of Led Zeppelin but of [legendary graphic design firm] Hipgnosis, as well.”

Led Zeppelin would record three songs for In Through the Out Door that would not make the final cut but instead be included on their “odds & sods” compilation, Coda, released two years after John Bonham’s tragic passing in 1980.  My favorite of the three “rejected” tracks is “Wearing & Tearing” — recorded at Stockholm’s Polar Studios in November, 1978:

“Wearing and Tearing”     Led Zeppelin     1978

Interesting to learn that “Wearing and Tearing” (along with fellow reject, “Darlene”) would be released in the UK as a 45 — the only question, though, is whether this single was a legitimate release.  Says 45Cat contributor sixtiesbeat, “It’s well known that [matrix] #19421 was set aside for ‘Wearing And Tearing’ to be released at Knebworth in 1979.  But as far as I know, the plan was scrapped and no 45s were actually pressed.  I suspect that an enterprising bootlegger is trying to re-write history here.”  Other 45Cat contributors, however, are not convinced.  Yet another musical controversy.

(Possible bootleg) single release

Led Zep 45As iTunes points out, In Through the Out Door is “one of the few pre-SoundScan era releases to debut atop the Billboard chart.”  But wait, there’s a recent twist to the story:  Rolling Stone reported this past August that, 36 years later, the album is back in the Top Ten!

I admit shamefacedly that, under the flimsiest of pretexts, I am classifying this piece (along with the Donovan album) as Color-Your-Own Album Covers — is this a jailable offense?