Paul Beaver Played Clavinet, Too

Remember last month when I was hot on the trail of identifying the first recording of a clavinet, thanks to a tip from Jim Kimsey: “Six O’Clock” by John Sebastian & The Lovin’ Spoonful?  Was John Sebastian‘s “electric harpsichord” (as he referred to the instrument), in fact, a clavinet?  Sebastian himself was gracious enough to respond to this historian-in-training:

“It was a Hohner Clavinet.  My father [John B. Sebastian] was a concert chromatic harmonica player, so I was way inside when it came to Hohner (I played with Matt Hohner’s kids.)   I may have had one of the first, due also to the band’s success.”

I cannot help but imagine the incredible array of harmonicas between the two households. Fun to note how musical advertising from around this time was so refreshingly fun and uncomplicated.

Hohner ad-iiHohner ad-i

Hohner ad-charlie mccoyHohner ad-johnny cash

Throwing a musical bone to Paul Guinnessy here

Hohner ad-astronautGuess who else was in on the ground floor with the clavinet?  If you guessed Paul Beaver, because his name is in the title of this piece, you would be correct!   Zero to 180 is eternally thankful to the Bob Moog Foundation for all the fascinating (and free) history on its website.  As Thom Holmes writes:

“One can’t help but notice that nine of the first ten Moog albums had one person in common—musician Paul Beaver.  By late 1966, he and Bernie Krause had pooled their funds to buy a Moog Modular of their own.  Beaver was designated as Moog’s West Coast Representative and together, he and Krause operated a company called Parasound that provided consulting, recording, and production services using the Moog Modular and other instruments.  Beginning in April of 1967, he and Bernie were recruited to bring the Moog Synthesizer to a variety of recording sessions.  These first Moog productions from the April 1967 time-frame began to appear on vinyl by May and June 1967.  Another burst of activity occurred after Beaver and Krause set up a booth to demonstrate the Moog at the Monterey Jazz Festival in June 1967, leading to several sessions with rock groups including the Doors and The Monkees.  By January, however, you still only needed ten fingers to count the number of records featuring the Moog.”

Photo of Paul Beaver – courtesy Bob Moog Foundation

Paul BeaverVibraphonist Emil Richards would pull off a birthstone concept with his New Sound Element “Stones” album from 1967:  twelve songs, one for each astrological gemstone.  Surprisingly little has been written about this early Moog album that still fetches decent scratch on the second-hand market.

Clavinet, what clavinet?  And yet it says right there in the musician credits – Paul Beaver, clavinet, as well as Moog.  All I hear is the Moog.

“Diamond”     Emil Richards     1967

Was New Sound Element, in fact, recorded prior to February, 1967 — the release date of the debut album by The Left Banke, whose “Let Go of You Girl” appears to be the first clavinet on a pop record?   Almost certainly not, as recordings with Beaver & Krause’s new Moog only began that April.  Nevertheless, Emil Richards’ “Stones” album would be the third recording ever to feature the Moog modular synthesizer, according to Holmes:

“Although Paul Beaver set-up the Moog, Richards was actively engaged in experimenting with the synthesizer for this session.  Richards told me that, ‘Beaver assisted as programmer for these sessions.  I played the synthesizer and all mallet instruments on all twelve tracks.’

This is the first commercial recording to credit the ‘Moog Synthesizer’ by name.”

In 2011 NPR’s Weekend Edition put together a feature piece on “Tinseltown’s Timekeeper” — Emil Richards — who would perform the finger snaps for The Addams Family TV theme, bongos for Mission Impossible‘s theme song, xylophone on The Simpsons‘ opening theme, and endless other sessions as one of the top percussionists working on the West Coast.

Photo of Emil Richards courtesy of NPR

Emil Richards-x

Selected Emil Richards Sessionography

Also worth noting that Richards played on one of my wife’s favorite albums – Queen Latifah’s Dana Owens Album from 2004.  The following year, Richards would help Paul Anka recast contemporary rock (e.g., “Smells Like Teen Spirit“) in swing band fashion (á la In a Metal Mood, Pat Boone’s rebranding effort from 1997) via 2005’s Rock Swings.

Richards is still musically active — follow him on Facebook why doncha?

Larry Fast: Digital, Experimental

Tip of the hat to my old tennis partner and high school music rival. Ed Goldstein [he was in The Head Band with future “Smooth” songwriter, Itaal Shur, and one-time-bassist-for-Sleepy-Labeef-turned-sociology-professor, Adam Moskowitz, while I was in The Max, formerly Max & the Bluegills], who recently paid tribute to Peter Gabriel and late-70s Genesis as pivotal influences on his approach to percussion, with “Games Without Frontiers” leading the way as his favorite Gabriel track.

As music entered the ’80s, I remember how things got increasingly and disconcertedly digital — MIDI, disk drives, drum machines and the like — putting some of us analog-minded folks off, at least initially.  Not Ed, though, who helped serve as a bridge to fearful, reactionary types like me, whose old school heart will always yearn for analog-only devices, such as a Hammond organ with a rotating Leslie speaker, or a Moog Taurus bass pedal synthesizer (my college roommate had one), or an Echoplex tape delay effects unit (sax man & friend, Bruce Batté, once had one), without which dub reggae would almost certainly have never been born.

                  Hammond B-3                                   red Walnut Leslie Speaker Cabinet

Hammond B-3Leslie speaker

Moog Taurus II Bass Pedal Synth                 Echoplex – Complete with Case

Moog Taurus Bass PedalsEchoplex - vintage

“Games Without Frontiers,” unsurprisingly, would be cited in a fun historical romp – “Ghosts in the Machine:  The Most Important Drum Machines in Music History” – which begins in 1959 with Wurlitzer’s built-in percussion sidekick, the Side Man.  Peter Gabriel, as it turns out, utilized a Linn Drum predecessor I was not aware of until now – PAiA – that enjoys the distinction of being the “first programmable drum machine in history,” having been introduced to the marketplace in 1975.

Frustratingly, that information is not spelled out in the otherwise detailed credits captured on Discogs for the UK edition of Peter Gabriel’s third album from 1978.   Did Gabriel himself do the drum programming vs. Jerry Marotta & Phil Collins, the drummers listed on the track?  We do know, however, that Gabriel and Larry Fast both did some programming with respect to synthesizers, such as “Games Without Frontiers,” on which both musicians programmed synth bass lines (one of which I initially assumed to be Tony Levin playing a Chapman Stick).

Larry Fast LPSoon after playing bagpipes on the album’s concluding track “Biko,” Larry Fast — under the name Synergy — would issue his fourth long-playing release Games, an “all electronic production” that, like his three previous efforts, would be produced, engineered and programmed by Fast himself.   Released in 1979, Games is an instrumental song cycle that some might deem “experimental, ambient” (Discogs) and challenging at times but is hard to categorize given the dynamics and dramatic shifts in mood and intensity, as demonstrated on six-minute composition “Delta Four”:

“Delta Four”     Synergy     1979

From the liner notes courtesy of Discogs:

Digital synthesis realized using the digital synthesizer at Bell Laboratories – Murray Hill, New Jersey.

Mixed at House of Music June and July 1979 by Larry Fast except Delta One which was mixed by Charlie Conrad & Larry Fast.  Mastered by Robert Ludwig, Masterdisk, NYC.

Digital synthesizer computer programming by Greg Sims.  Equipment used on this production manufactured by — Moog Music Inc.; Oberheim Electronics; Sequential Circuits; Paia Electronics; 360 Systems; Musitronics; MXR; DBX; MCI; Eventide Clockworks; Sony; Teac-Tascam; EMT; The Synergy System; Apple Computer Corp.; Bell Labs Digital Synthesizer; Deltalab Research.

Soundcheck:  “Delta 3” [parts A-F] developed from themes written during soundchecks on the August to December 1978 Peter Gabriel Tour.  “Delta Two” themes are remnants of 1974’s electronic Realizations For Rock Orchestra writing sessions.  “Delta Four” is a surviving digital synthesizer sequencer program experiment combined with some advanced tape loops.  “Delta One” is an experiment fusing the pop and electronic vocabularies of turn of the decade composition.

Electronic music pioneer & Occasional Bagpipist – Larry Fast

Larry FastIn a 2004 interview, Larry Fast would have a lot to say about the experience of the album:

“Games was the first encounter on a Synergy album with digital synthesis and to some degree, digital recording.  It was done under laboratory conditions at Bell Labs, which was then the crown jewel of the AT&T Research Lab.  It’s still there [or is it?], but it’s now part of the crown jewels of Lucent.  AT&T was the telephone company—Ma Bell—back then and had lots of wonderful “blue sky” research going on in computers, audio and various other technologies.  They would fund these things thinking—and rightfully so—that at some point, something would surface out of these free thinking projects that might be beneficial to the phone company.  They don’t do that so much anymore.  At that time, there wasn’t any real competition in the phone business.  Now, it’s very cutthroat.  However, at that time, one of their great, shining lights was Max Matthews, one of the pioneers of computer music and electronic music, at the academic and theoretical level. One of his departments was speech and synthesis.  They were exploring several areas of synthesizers, speech and vocals, which could be made into singing.  He had worked on one project as early as 1976 that incorporated aspects of that.

By 1978, they had some of the very earliest digital synthesizers, running essentially as software, with some concurrent specialized hardware they had built on minicomputers.  They were just mind-boggling to me after struggling to extract sounds from the Moog, Oberheim and related instruments I had been working with in the analog world.  This was positively world changing.  Again, like any technology at the beginning, it was a little tedious and difficult to control. I was just getting my feet wet, but there were a few passages recorded at Bell Labs that found their way onto the Games record.  The passages were enhanced with some of the analog synthesizers to flesh out the arrangements.  It was a very eye opening experience.  It set part of the tone for the album.  The other aspect of Games it that I was on the road a lot with the Peter Gabriel band and recording with them as well.  It meant that some of the writing was done on the road, captured on small cassette recorders and lots of scribbled-down notes.  It was the first album where I hadn’t set aside a block of time in my composer’s studio to write.  It was a different approach.”

Is it ironic that this digital work was issued on 8 TRACK?

Larry Fast 8 trackEd Goldstein’s current percussion philosophies are being carried out through Big Car Jack.

Big Car Jack-xThis piece, by the way, is not Zero to 180’s first reference to bagpipes in popular music — sorry Ed, I’m not referring to AC/DC’s “It’s a Long Way to the Top (If You Wanna Rock ‘n’ Roll)” but rather “Reggae Bagpipes“!

Abstract Interjection!  This is the 4th Zero to 180 piece tagged as “Experimental Pop

Alvino Rey’s Rag of Steel

Sadly, too many people are unaware that, before Les Paul and his electronic wizardry, steel guitarist bandleader, Alvino Rey, had already developed the prototype for the first modern electric guitar and created the “Sono-Vox,” a precursor to the “talk box,” as I learned this past August.

Check out the multi-tracked steel guitar parts on Alvino Rey’s fresh arrangement of the Leon McAuliffe standard, “Steel Guitar Rag” that includes some fun call-and-response between steel guitar and orchestra:

“Steel Guitar Rag”     Alvino Rey     1961

Dramatic ending — glissando effect immediately makes one think of Rey’s work with Juan Garcia Esquivel.

Alvino Rey:  Musically Futuristic Coda II

As MetaFilter points out, this scene from the film Jam Session is “possibly the best available demonstration of Alvino Rey as a bandleader, showman and soloist.  Includes both the volume/tone technique and the full singing guitar treatment.  Stringy, the talking steel guitar, wins a cutting contest with clarinetist, Skeets Herfurt.”

“St. Louis Blues”     Alvino Rey + Stringy the Talking Steel Guitar     1942?

Stringy, The Talking Steel Guitar Puppet!

Stringy-b

“Chef d’Oeuvre”: Negative Radio Plays?

I am reading the memoir of music industry legend, Bob Thiele — producer at Coral Records who “discovered” Buddy Holly and would later work with Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, Count Basie, John Coltrane, Sonny Rollins, Albert Ayler, Joe Turner, Otis Spann, Gil Scott-Heron, and Bernard “Pretty” Purdie & the Playboys, among many other artists.

Funny Thiele didn’t mention having produced Jon Appleton’s (highly) experimental album.  The fact that “Chef D’Oeuvre” was released as a 45 delights me to no end:

“Chef d’Oeuvre”     Jon Appleton     1969

Be sure to listen for the stereophonic loop of a Chef Boyardee jingle – a recurring motif.

45Cat’s Harvestman Man humorously observes:  “If it’s possible for a record to actually get a negative number of plays on the radio, this would be a likely candidate … it is that weird.”

Appleton 45

Thanks to Vintage Vinyl Revival for the liner notes to Appleton Syntonic Menagerie from which I take this excerpt:

“Labels, categories, boundary lines – the neat classifications separating musical experiences – are dissolving rapidly.  Young musicians and listeners, brought up in a “global village” because of the pervasiveness of television, recordings, and transistor radios, refuse to be compressed by past conventions.  The popular music of the present is, for example, a continually changing fusion of rock, country and wester, blues, Indian influenes, echoes of Appalachian ballads, jazz, rhythm and blues, and many other elements.

“Simultaneously, young composers – who, in another time, would have been called “classical” composers – are also probing, discovering, and transcending territorial markings of the past. Jon Howard Appleton, for example.  Since 1967, he has been Director of the Electronic Music Studio at Dartmouth, where he is also Assistant Professor of Music.  [This] The first album of his work – on Flying Dutchman – reveals the open-ended scope and resourcefulness of the new music as well as Appleton’s inventive singularity.”

Appleton would release one more LP for Flying Dutchman – a collaboration with Don Cherry, father of Neneh.

Alvino Rey: Steel Guitarist Bandleader

Thanks to Andy Volk of the Steel Guitar Forum for pointing me to Anne Miller’s fascinating profile of steel guitarist bandleader Alvino Rey for the Smithsonian in which we learn Rey, as a consultant for Gibson in the 1930s, helped develop the prototype for the ES-150 (made famous by Charlie Christian), the first modern electric guitar.  Alvino Rey, therefore, is an un(der)-acknowledged “father of the electric guitar.”

Alvino Rey:  musical bat advocate

Alvino Rey - bat fanCan you name any other pop bandleaders who played the steel guitar besides Alvino Rey? I didn’t think so.

In this TV clip, Lawrence Welk informs his audience that Alvino Rey is(was) a Capitol recording artist whose latest album is Ping Pong — and then insists that Rey play a song not even on the album!   Rey’s musicianship in this performance is masterful:

“Hindustan”     Alvino Rey on The Lawrence Welk Show     1959?

The Smithsonian article also pointed out the reason for the facial resemblance between Alvino Rey and Win (& Will) Butler of Arcade Fire:  it’s genetic.  Rey is the Butler brothers’ grandfather – a fact that becomes quite clear when you look at the photo that accompanies this tribute page from the Gibson Guitars website:

“Built by Alvino Rey and John Kutilek as a test bed for their new pickup, the instrument pictured here (below) comprises a simple frame to which a vestigial ‘body’, fingerboard and headstock – all of which are fabricated from sheet brass – are attached.  Hardware includes a brass nut and bridge, inexpensive tuners and a basic trapeze tailpiece.  The pickup itself consists of two magnets with the strings running between the top magnet and a coil of wire.  The pickup was hardwired with no jack socket or controls.”

Alvino Rey with gibson es-150 prototype in 1997     (gibson guitars website)

Alvino Rey with ES-150 Prototype

Alvino Rey:  A Futuristic Musical Coda

Alvino Rey would pass in 2004, and the following year, Arcade Fire would release a split single, with a 1940 radio broadcast of the Alvino Rey Orchestra used for the flip side.  This performance of the song, “My Buddy,” would also feature Win & Will Butler’s grandmother, Luise King Rey (of The King Sisters) on the Sono-Vox, a 1930s electronic precursor to the “talk box” that Rey himself pioneered and was “rediscovered” in the 1960s & 70s by the two Petes:  Drake & Frampton.

“My Buddy” (live)     Alvino Rey Orchestra     1940

Lucille Ball would use a Sono-Vox to emulate the sound of a freight train whistle in this fascinating Pathe newsreel snippet.

1960 Capitol LP

Alvino Rey LP

Perrey & Kingsley’s Secret Ondioline

Jean Jacques Perrey & Gershon Kingsley – originators of funny & futuristic-sounding 60s instrumental music with massive kid appeal – found common cause intermittently as a recording act that produced a total of three full-length albums and two single releases.  Perrey & Kingsley’s appearance on an episode of I’ve Got a Secret (this video claims) is the duo’s sole live performance.  Perrey, was originally hired by the ondioline’s inventor, Georges Jenny, to demonstrate the electronic instrument’s unusual expressiveness and ability to emulate other musical instruments as shown here in charming fashion:

Jean Jacques Perrey & Gershon Kingsley     “Spooks in Space”     1966

LP Releases by Jean-Jacques Perrey and/or Gershon Kingsley

Perrey & Kingsley LP-1Perrey & Kingsley LP-2Perrey LP-aaKingsley LP-aaPerrey LP-bbKingsley LP-bb

The ondioline would give birth to the clavioline (the instrument behind that peppy 1960 UK instrumental “M1” profiled earlier), which would then give birth to the (heavily-modifed) “Musitron” – the distinctive keyboard sound behind Del Shannon’s “Runaway” from 1961.

OndiolineSy Mann (the creative force behind the Switched On Santa Moog album, as well as 1971’s Shaft as arranged by “Soul” Mann & the Bros.) would get in on the ondioline game with a 1966 7-inch single released in Germany “Der Fröhliche Radfahrer” b/w “Fahrt In’s Glück”:

“Der Fröhliche Radfahrer”     Sy & Bob Mann and the ondioline band     1966

45Cat reveals that The Ondioline Band would release a 7-inch “Last Bicycle to Brussels” b/w “The Lovers of Cologne” in the UK in 1966.

More individual LP Releases by Jean-Jacques Perrey and Gershon Kingsley

Perrey LP-ccKingsley LP-ccPerrey LP-ddKingsley LP-dPerrey & Kingsley 8-track tapeOndioline Trivia:

  • Al Kooper played ondioline on Blood, Sweat & Tears’ 1968 debut LP, as well as 1968’s Super Session with Mike Bloomfield and Stephen Stills.
  • Sy Mann’s Switched On Santa album was engineered and mixed by Jean-Jacques Perrey.
  • Richie Havens plays an ondioline on his 1969 album, Richard P. Havens 1983.
  • Gershon Kingsley is the mastermind behind 1972 instrumental “Popcorn” – the smash hit attributed to ‘Hot Butter.’

Kingsley sheet musicThis is the fifteenth Zero to 180 piece to be tagged electronic musical instruments.

“Semi-Detached Suburban Mr. James”: More Early Mellotron

Graham Bond‘s July 1, 1965 recording of “Baby Can It Be True” (as noted in the previous post) was likely the first appearances of a Mellotron in popular music.  Manfred Mann‘s “Semi-Detached Suburban Mr. James” – the Mellotron’s next big pop moment – would be released as an A-side in October, 1966 at the same time The Beatles’ were incorporating a Mellotron in their demos for “Strawberry Fields Forever”:

“Semi-Detached Suburban Mr. James”     Manfred Mann     1966

Planet Mellotron pegs “Semi-Detached Suburban” as “possibly the first Mellotron hit” (reached #2 UK).  Manfred Mann would continue to use the Mellotron to great effect on 1967’s (single-only) “Ha! Ha! Said the Clown” and “So Long Dad.”

Manfred Mann 45-bManfred Mann 45-aManfred Mann 45-cManfred Mann 45-d

Lennon Takes Delivery of His Mellotron

Love the fact that the Mellotron merits an entry in The Beatles Bible for August 16, 1965 – “John Lennon’s Mellotron is Delivered to Weybridge“:

“While The Beatles were on tour in North America, a Mellotron was delivered to Kenwood, John Lennon’s home in Weybridge, England.   Lennon had seen a Mellotron for the first time on 9 August 1965, while producing The Silkie’s version ‘You’ve Got To Hide Your Love Away’ at London’s IBC Studios.

The Mellotron had a range of ‘sampled’ sounds stored on magnetic tapes, which had been recorded at IBC in 1964.  Lennon was intrigued and impressed with the instrument, and immediately ordered one in black.

The instrument was used on a number of recordings by The Beatles from 1966 onwards, perhaps most notably in the introduction to ‘Strawberry Fields Forever.'”

“Baby Can It Be True”: Early Mellotron

“Strawberry Fields Forever” would take the music world by storm in February, 1967, in no small part, due to the opening flute sounds produced by a tape-driven sampling keyboard known as a Mellotron [link to “Top 10 Mellotron Songs” from Ultimate Classic Rock].

Mellotron Diagram

Two years earlier, however, Graham Bond had already employed this radical and revolutionary instrument to great effect on what is widely considered to be the first use of a Mellotron on a popular recording — 1965’s “Baby Can It Be True“:

“Baby Can It Be True”     The Graham Bond Organization”     1965

Recorded in one take on July 1, 1965, “Baby Can It Be True” – strictly an album track,from There’s a Bond Between Us – would never enjoy release in 7-inch form.

Graham Bond LP[Left to right (above): Ginger Baker; Jack Bruce; Graham Bond & Dick Heckstall-Smith]

Ginger Baker is out on tour and will be playing at DC’s historic Howard Theatre – June 19.

Graham Bond Organisation:  Secret Musicians on B-Side by The Who!

As Graham Bond points out on his own website, the Graham Bond Organisation is the uncredited jazz quartet simply identified as “The Who Orchestra” on “Waltz for a Pig” – an instrumental that was used (for unclear reasons) as the flip side of The Who’s Top 10 UK (and Australia, Netherlands & New Zealand) radio hit, “Substitute” in March, 1966.

The musicians on “Waltz For A Pig:  Graham Bond (organ), Ginger Baker (drums), Dick Heckstall-Smith (tenor sax) and Mike Falana (trumpet).

“Waltz for a Pig” written by “Butcher” — coincidence?

Who 45

This is the thirteenth Zero to 180 piece to be tagged electronic musical instruments.

Link to related piece:  “Semi-Detached Suburban Mr. James“:  More Early Mellotron

“Nashville Moog”: Synth-a-billy

Tennessean synthesist, Gil Trythall, creates his own one-man electronic bluegrass band when he and his Moog synthesizer pay a visit to the Grand Ole Opry to shake up the Nashville musical establishment on “Nashville Moog” from 1973:

“Nashville Moog”     Gil Trythall     1973

“Nashville Moog” – from Trythall’s second album, Nashville Gold: Switched On Moog, would also serve as the B-side of a promo 7″ with “Martha White Theme” as the A-side.   Nashville Gold would also enjoy release in Australia.

Nashville Gold LP

Trythall would release his debut 45 – “Yakety Moog” b/w “Foggy Mountain Breakdown” – three years prior in 1970 on the Athena label.

Nashville MoogAccording to his own website

“Dr. Gilbert Trythall taught music at Knox College, Peabody College (now part of Vanderbilt University), West Virginia University, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo in Vitória, Brasil, and Brookhaven College, Dallas for more than 35 years.  He is best known as the synthesist of the electronic country music albums, Country Moog and Nashville Gold:  Switched on Moog.   He is a graduate of the University of Tennessee, Northwestern and Cornell Universities and an award winning composer of numerous traditional and electronic compositions.  Books include Sixteenth Century Counterpoint and Eighteenth Century Counterpoint (published by McGraw Hill) and Principles and Practice of Electronic Music (Grossett and Dunlap, out of print).       See entry in Who’s Who in America for additional information.”

This is the twelfth Zero to 180 piece to be tagged electronic musical instruments.

Dick Denney’s Secret Guitar Organ

Thanks to Vintage Guitar Magazine‘s October 2013 edition for its fascinating history of Vox, makers of musical amplifiers (primarily) but also effects pedals, guitars, organs and guitar-organs.  Peter Stuart Kohman’s article references Dick Denney’s futuristic appearance on Steve Allen’s I’ve Got a Secret 1960s game show – and fortunately, there’s a clip of this fascinating musical demonstration and great TV history moment:

Dick Denney Demonstrates the Vox V251 Guitar Organ     1967

It is particularly intriguing to see Denney – the instrument’s co-designer (who appears around the 6:30 mark) – show off the instrument’s “live looping” feature that allows the musician to sample & repeat a musical riff and then improvise melody lines on top of this looped musical accompaniment — a special capability that would only become accessible to the consumer market 30 years later (i.e., “one-man digital bands”).

Vox Guitar Organ

This innovative technology – “a hollow metal neck full of hand-wired contacts (each fret had an individual trigger point for each string)” – would prove, however to have still been in its beta stage.  According to Kohman, “While it did work (at least in the right hands), in the field it proved unreliable at best.”  And thus, the Vox Guitar Organ (1) “was never really a commercial success” (2) an “over-the-top design” and (3) “an infamous part of guitar history.”

voxmobile (ford cobra 289 v-8)  & Jimmy Bryant – “world’s fastest guitarist”

Jimmy Bryant & Voxmobile