“Chef d’Oeuvre”: Negative Radio Plays?

I am reading the memoir of music industry legend, Bob Thiele — producer at Coral Records who “discovered” Buddy Holly and would later work with Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, Count Basie, John Coltrane, Sonny Rollins, Albert Ayler, Joe Turner, Otis Spann, Gil Scott-Heron, and Bernard “Pretty” Purdie & the Playboys, among many other artists.

Funny Thiele didn’t mention having produced Jon Appleton’s (highly) experimental album.  The fact that “Chef D’Oeuvre” was released as a 45 delights me to no end:

“Chef d’Oeuvre”     Jon Appleton     1969

Be sure to listen for the stereophonic loop of a Chef Boyardee jingle – a recurring motif.

45Cat’s Harvestman Man humorously observes:  “If it’s possible for a record to actually get a negative number of plays on the radio, this would be a likely candidate … it is that weird.”

Appleton 45

Thanks to Vintage Vinyl Revival for the liner notes to Appleton Syntonic Menagerie from which I take this excerpt:

“Labels, categories, boundary lines – the neat classifications separating musical experiences – are dissolving rapidly.  Young musicians and listeners, brought up in a “global village” because of the pervasiveness of television, recordings, and transistor radios, refuse to be compressed by past conventions.  The popular music of the present is, for example, a continually changing fusion of rock, country and wester, blues, Indian influenes, echoes of Appalachian ballads, jazz, rhythm and blues, and many other elements.

“Simultaneously, young composers – who, in another time, would have been called “classical” composers – are also probing, discovering, and transcending territorial markings of the past. Jon Howard Appleton, for example.  Since 1967, he has been Director of the Electronic Music Studio at Dartmouth, where he is also Assistant Professor of Music.  [This] The first album of his work – on Flying Dutchman – reveals the open-ended scope and resourcefulness of the new music as well as Appleton’s inventive singularity.”

Appleton would release one more LP for Flying Dutchman – a collaboration with Don Cherry, father of Neneh.