Fact: DC’s the Telecaster Town

Jake Flack of the Rhodes Tavern Troubadours makes an air-tight case for proving that the Nation’s Capital truly is the Telecaster town – and he’s not afraid to name names:

DC’s the Telecaster Town – Rhodes Tavern Troubadours

[Pssst:  Click the triangle to play “DC’s the Telecaster Town” by The Rhodes Tavern Troubadours.]

Danny gatton & Evan Johns flying blind

Danny Gatton & Evan Johns Roy Buchanan                                                 Bill Kirchen

Roy B - TelecasterBill K - Telecaster

dave chappell                                                   Jake Flack

Dave Chappell - TeleJake Flack - Tele

Chick hall Jr.

Chick Hall - TelecasterFrom 2002’s most excellent (and transit-inspired) album, On the Red Line, recorded in Rockville, Maryland at Hit & Run, with Dave Chappell and Jake Flack on guitars & vocals, Mark Noone on bass & vocals, and Jack O’Dell on drums & vocals — with special guest, Bill Kirchen, on Telecaster.

“Springfield Guitar Social”: Who’s Who of Guitar Wizardry

If you’re pressed for time but curious to know more about the stringed instrument masters who inspired and laid the groundwork for the the classic rock generation to come, here is a two-and-a-half minute Cliffs Notes guide that demonstrates Thumbs Carllile‘s uncanny ability to play in the style of such guitarists as Grady Martin, Jimmy Bryant, Les Paul, George Barnes, Chet Atkins, Hank Garland, Speedy West, Billy Byrd – and himself:

This musical roll call of fleet-fingered axe-pickers was recorded in 1958 and released on Starday in 7-inch as well as 12-inch form.

At No Extra Cost

If you’ve never seen Thumbs Carllile play, then you’re really in for a treat.  As it turns out, Stanley Jordan wasn’t the first person to approach playing the guitar like a piano.  Check out this exhilarating version of “Li’l Liza Jane” from Bill Wemberly & His Country Rhythm Boys, featuring the dual guitar wizardry of Thumbs Carllile and Curly Chalker from Red Foley’s “Ozark Jubilee” TV show.

Musical Roll Call – Special Trucker’s Edition: “There Ain’t No Easy Run”

Dave Dudley and Tom T. Hall collaborated on a musical roll call that cleverly pays tribute to the rich tapestry of American trucking firms that happened to be in existence as of December 1967 when this song was recorded and subsequently released on Dudley’s 1968 Mercury album, Thanks for All the Miles:

There Ain’t No Easy Run – Dave Dudley

[Pssst:  Click on the triangle above to hear “There Ain’t No Easy Run” by Dave Dudley.]

“There Ain’t No Easy Run” was a Top 10 country hit, while the album made the Top 40 on the country charts.

Dave Dudley - Thanks for All the Miles

Musician and recording credits for this album – although isn’t that Jimmy Colvard (“Six Days on the Road”) playing his distinctive brand of percussive lead guitar?

Jerry Kennedy - guitar/dobro
Harold Bradley, Ray Edenton, Jerry Shook, Chip Young - guitar
Pete Drake - steel
Bob Moore - bass
Buddy Harman - drums
Hargus Pig Robbins - piano
Recorded:
December 1967 - Columbia Recording Studio - Nashville

Musical Roll Call pt. 2: “You Can’t Wynn Stewart”

People readily associate Buck Owens, Merle Haggard, and Red Simpson with the legendary Bakersfield Sound, but not enough people associate the great Wynn Stewart,  as well.  Wynn’s musical roll call – “You Can’t Wynn Stewart” – playfully uses the names of country music notables (e.g., “She’ll hurt your Pride, Charley … Johnny, she’ll spend all your Cash”) to scare away potential rivals for the affection of his sweetheart.

Someone on YouTube put together a great accompanying video for this song:

That’s the late great Ralph Mooney playing pedal steel on a song that was recorded in 1969 and released on Wynn’s You Don’t Care What Happens to Me LP from 1970 on the Capitol label – home of the Bakersfield Sound.  Amazingly, this surefire winner of a song never enjoyed single release, not even as a B-side:

Wynn Stewart

Musician and recording credits for the album:

Tommy Collins, Russ Hansen, John Wakely, Bobby George, Dale Noe, 
Glenn Keener, Al Bruneau & Clarence White - guitar
Ralph Mooney - steel guitar
Bobby Austin, Red Wooten, Stanley Puls & Chuck Berghofer - bass
Helen Price, Archie Francis & Sam Goldstein - drums
Larry Muhoberac & Bob Pierce - piano
Earl Ball - piano/percussion
Recorded:
1968 & 1969 - Capitol Recording Studio - Hollywood

Musical Roll Call pt. 1: “Soul Train”

Little Royal‘s musical roll call of soul music luminaries – “Soul Train” from 1972 – is connected to the post-Syd Nathan era of the King Records story after Starday Records had purchased King and henceforth became known as Starday-King:

“Soul Train”     Little Royal      1972

Interesting to see which artists were chosen for the various work assignments aboard the train – i.e., Wilson Pickett as engineer, Ike & Tina as faretakers, Staples Singers as cooks, Isaac Hayes as bandleader, and Elvis (oddly) as banker.  Most surprising of all is the inclusion of The Osmonds (as conductors) — I can only assume this is in response to the their funky hit of the year prior, 1971’s “Crazy Horses.”  Click here to check out a live clip of the overly-rocking Osmond Brothers stomping their way through this American Indian-inspired piece of hard-charging funky rock – with suitable stage attire that must be seen to be believed.

Tri-Us was a groovy little label that was not long for this world, alas.

Soul Train - Little RoyalClick on this link to view the label’s releases, most of them Huey P. Meaux productions devoted to Little Royal.   According to Little Royal’s bio on the website, Last.fm:  “Little Royal’s Tri-Us recordings are worth checking out, as they are fine pieces of Southern soul in its final hour.”