Marie “Queenie” Lyons: Soul Fever

I am stunned to discover that Marie “Queenie” Lyons’ playful retort to the Isley Brothers – “Your Thing Ain’t Good Without My Thing” (answer song of sorts to “It’s Your Thing“) and an obvious candidate for an A-side – would remain an album-only track from 1970’s Soul Fever on DeLuxe, an imprint of Starday-King Records (from King’s post-Syd Nathan era):

“Your Thing Ain’t No Good Without My Thing”     Marie “Queenie” Lyons     1969

Billboard would award the Soul Fever LP “Four-Stars” (albums with “sales potential within their category of music and possible chart items”) in its October 10, 1970 edition.

Michel Rupli’s The King Labels:  A Discography does not say whether this album was recorded at King’s Cincinnati studios – although many suspect it was.  Soul Fever, sadly, would be Marie “Queenie” Lyons’ first and only album release.

‘Soul Fever’ back cover – with liner notes by WLAC’s Bill “Hoss” Allen

Soul Fever - back coverThings I learned about Marie “Queenie” Lyons from reading Hoss Allen’s liner notes:

  • Hails from Archibald, Louisiana but moved to Ashtabula, Ohio at a young age.
  • First performed professionally in 1963 at the Club Castaway in Geneva, Ohio.
  • Served as vocalist in 1964 with The King Curtis Band in New York City.
  • Performed with Jackie Wilson, Fats Domino, The Coasters, Jerry Lee Lewis, and – her idol and inspiration – James Brown, among many others.

One of the funkiest soul LPs ever to drop, according to Noah S. Guiney

Soul Fever - front coverBuckeye Beat says that Lyons is still active and that Queenie’s Lounge, her bar in Ashtabula, Ohio (as of 2014) – is/was still open for business.

Queenie's Lounge - Ohio

Soul and Jazz and Funk points out that the official CD release of this high-demand album was surprisingly late in coming – 2008.

Harvard Crimson’s, Noah S. Guiney, is aghast that Marie “Queenie” Lyons “was left cruelly unappreciated for so long” due to “a combination of small-label politics and a miniscule marketing budget” and demands that music historians sit up and take notice of this miscarriage of justice.